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Fidel comes out against fracking

Defying rumors of his death, Blogger Fidel is back with a new column, weighing in on, of all things, the debate over hydrofracking, calling it a "march into the abyss" :  "It is sufficient to point out that among the numerous chemical substances injected with the water to extract this gas is found benzene and ...

Jorge Rey/Getty Images
Jorge Rey/Getty Images

Defying rumors of his death, Blogger Fidel is back with a new column, weighing in on, of all things, the debate over hydrofracking, calling it a "march into the abyss" : 

"It is sufficient to point out that among the numerous chemical substances injected with the water to extract this gas is found benzene and toluene, which are substances terribly carcinogenic," he wrote.

The information on shale gas was something "no political cadre or sensible person could ignore," he said.

Castro said he was so intent on getting the word out, he had "let the festive days of the old and new year pass by" working on his column.

Castro has weighed in on enironmental issues before, denouncing ethanol subsidies, crticizing the U.S. over the handling of the Gulf oil spill and promoting energy efficient lightbulbs.  

Of course, Cuba’s own oil drilling plans have raised some red flags for environmentalists as well. 

Defying rumors of his death, Blogger Fidel is back with a new column, weighing in on, of all things, the debate over hydrofracking, calling it a "march into the abyss" : 

"It is sufficient to point out that among the numerous chemical substances injected with the water to extract this gas is found benzene and toluene, which are substances terribly carcinogenic," he wrote.

The information on shale gas was something "no political cadre or sensible person could ignore," he said.

Castro said he was so intent on getting the word out, he had "let the festive days of the old and new year pass by" working on his column.

Castro has weighed in on enironmental issues before, denouncing ethanol subsidies, crticizing the U.S. over the handling of the Gulf oil spill and promoting energy efficient lightbulbs.  

Of course, Cuba’s own oil drilling plans have raised some red flags for environmentalists as well. 

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy  Twitter: @joshuakeating

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