Bibi for president?

This Jerusalem Post headline might strike a bit too close to home, both for Republicans unhappy with their slate of candidates and those critical with U.S. politicians’ chumminess with the Israeli right: "GOP to nominate [Netanyahu] as US presidential candidate." No, it’s not breaking news — it’s the holiday of Purim, where Jews celebrate their ...

David Vaaknin - Pool/Getty Images
David Vaaknin - Pool/Getty Images
David Vaaknin - Pool/Getty Images

This Jerusalem Post headline might strike a bit too close to home, both for Republicans unhappy with their slate of candidates and those critical with U.S. politicians' chumminess with the Israeli right: "GOP to nominate [Netanyahu] as US presidential candidate."

No, it's not breaking news -- it's the holiday of Purim, where Jews celebrate their salvation from the ancient Persian empire and the evil Haman with a day of wine-drinking and general meshugana behavior. The Jerusalem Post's (hideous) website features an entire section of joke articles today that look as if they were torn straight from The Onion -- one reports that Netanyahu's wife's infatuation with Madonna will likely delay a strike on Iran, and the headline of another reads: "World Bank: Tel Aviv world's 3rd-largest Sudanese city"

But it's the Bibi-for-president article that takes the cake. "How hard can it be to run a country of 300 million gentiles," fake Netanyahu asks. And a fake Republcian strategist actually makes a pretty convincing case about Netanyahu's political strengths:

This Jerusalem Post headline might strike a bit too close to home, both for Republicans unhappy with their slate of candidates and those critical with U.S. politicians’ chumminess with the Israeli right: "GOP to nominate [Netanyahu] as US presidential candidate."

No, it’s not breaking news — it’s the holiday of Purim, where Jews celebrate their salvation from the ancient Persian empire and the evil Haman with a day of wine-drinking and general meshugana behavior. The Jerusalem Post‘s (hideous) website features an entire section of joke articles today that look as if they were torn straight from The Onion — one reports that Netanyahu’s wife’s infatuation with Madonna will likely delay a strike on Iran, and the headline of another reads: "World Bank: Tel Aviv world’s 3rd-largest Sudanese city"

But it’s the Bibi-for-president article that takes the cake. "How hard can it be to run a country of 300 million gentiles," fake Netanyahu asks. And a fake Republcian strategist actually makes a pretty convincing case about Netanyahu’s political strengths:

"Netanyahu has it all," a top GOP strategist said. "He has Romney’s economic credentials, Santorum’s conservative agenda, a kooky blonde third wife like Gingrich, and best of all, he just doesn’t like Obama."

Sarah Palin, eat your heart out.

Tag: Israel

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