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Xinhua ‘borrows’ a Foreign Policy article

In its last print issue, Foreign Policy published an article by Thomas Rid, a reader in war studies at King’s college London, arguing that virtual conflict is still more hype than reality. Someone at China’s state news agency Xinhua must have agreed, because they published practically the entire article (In Chinese here and here). Well, ...

In its last print issue, Foreign Policy published an article by Thomas Rid, a reader in war studies at King’s college London, arguing that virtual conflict is still more hype than reality. Someone at China’s state news agency Xinhua must have agreed, because they published practically the entire article (In Chinese here and here). Well, not all of it: the seventh section, which argues that the biggest worry in places like China "is not collapsing power plants, but collapsing political power," for some unexplainable reason didn’t get translated…

(h/t to Rid) 

 

In its last print issue, Foreign Policy published an article by Thomas Rid, a reader in war studies at King’s college London, arguing that virtual conflict is still more hype than reality. Someone at China’s state news agency Xinhua must have agreed, because they published practically the entire article (In Chinese here and here). Well, not all of it: the seventh section, which argues that the biggest worry in places like China "is not collapsing power plants, but collapsing political power," for some unexplainable reason didn’t get translated…

(h/t to Rid) 

 

Isaac Stone Fish is a journalist and senior fellow at the Asia Society’s Center on U.S-China Relations. He was formerly the Asia editor at Foreign Policy Magazine. Twitter: @isaacstonefish

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