Democracy Lab Weekly Highlights, March 30 2012

It’s been all Burma, all the time this week on the Democracy Lab, as we present our Burma Special Report. Experts weigh in on the crucial challenges the country must tackle in order to strengthen its path toward development, and (hopefully) democratization. Tom Malinowski assesses the strength of sanctions in encouraging regime liberalization in Burma, ...

Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images
Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

It's been all Burma, all the time this week on the Democracy Lab, as we present our Burma Special Report. Experts weigh in on the crucial challenges the country must tackle in order to strengthen its path toward development, and (hopefully) democratization.

Tom Malinowski assesses the strength of sanctions in encouraging regime liberalization in Burma, and what its future leaders must do to continue this process.

In an excerpt from The Lady and the Peacock, a new biography of Aung San Suu Kyi, journalist Peter Popham shows the moments when Daw's extraordinary courage facing the Burmese military turned her into an iconic figure.

It’s been all Burma, all the time this week on the Democracy Lab, as we present our Burma Special Report. Experts weigh in on the crucial challenges the country must tackle in order to strengthen its path toward development, and (hopefully) democratization.

Tom Malinowski assesses the strength of sanctions in encouraging regime liberalization in Burma, and what its future leaders must do to continue this process.

In an excerpt from The Lady and the Peacock, a new biography of Aung San Suu Kyi, journalist Peter Popham shows the moments when Daw’s extraordinary courage facing the Burmese military turned her into an iconic figure.

Rick Rowden assesses Burma’s options for economic opening and development.

And Christian Caryl reports from Burma’s former capital of Yangon, capturing the fever of excitement as well as the aura and strength of Aung San Suu Kyi. He also looks at how rampant corruption hinders the nation’s possibility for development.

Some recommended reads for the week:

Stanford University’s "Post-Soviet Post" looks at one factor impeding Ukraine’s prospects for democracy (and the rule of law, and human rights): the pervasiveness of sexism in government.

Following the coup last week, a new report by the International Crisis Group discusses how to put Mali back on the path of constitutional order.

The Democracy Digest follows the feuding between the SCAF and Muslim Brotherhood, the two main contenders for power in Egypt.

An interview published in the Council on Foreign Relations gives an insider’s view to the Arab League summit meeting in Baghdad this week.

Inna Lazareva is a researcher with the Legatum Institute in London.

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