Best Defense

Thomas E. Ricks' daily take on national security.

Are you one of those hard-core types who can’t get enough of Robert S. McNamara?

C’mon, you know who you are. The National Archives has just the session for you, on Tuesday April 10: The Historical Office of the Secretary of Defense and the National Archives invite you to a panel program discussing Robert S. McNamara’s most controversial years as Secretary of Defense (1965-68), and Clark Clifford’s brief but significant ...

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C'mon, you know who you are. The National Archives has just the session for you, on Tuesday April 10:

The Historical Office of the Secretary of Defense and the National Archives invite you to a panel program discussing Robert S. McNamara's most controversial years as Secretary of Defense (1965-68), and Clark Clifford's brief but significant successor tour as Secretary (1968-69). The event will take place at noon on 10 April 2012 at the McGowan Theater, National Archives, located at 7th and Constitution, NW, Washington, DC. 

Discussion will be based on the Historical Office's recent publication, McNamara, Clifford, and the Burdens of Vietnam, 1965-1969, by Edward J. Drea. Panel speakers will focus on the work of Secretaries of Defense McNamara and Clifford and the Vietnam War, but they will also address the impact of Vietnam on American defense interests in other parts of the world.

C’mon, you know who you are. The National Archives has just the session for you, on Tuesday April 10:

The Historical Office of the Secretary of Defense and the National Archives invite you to a panel program discussing Robert S. McNamara’s most controversial years as Secretary of Defense (1965-68), and Clark Clifford’s brief but significant successor tour as Secretary (1968-69). The event will take place at noon on 10 April 2012 at the McGowan Theater, National Archives, located at 7th and Constitution, NW, Washington, DC. 

Discussion will be based on the Historical Office’s recent publication, McNamara, Clifford, and the Burdens of Vietnam, 1965-1969, by Edward J. Drea. Panel speakers will focus on the work of Secretaries of Defense McNamara and Clifford and the Vietnam War, but they will also address the impact of Vietnam on American defense interests in other parts of the world.

David Ferriero, Archivist of the United States, will convene the panel and introduce Dr. Erin Mahan, Chief Historian, Historical Office of the Secretary of Defense. Dr. Mahan will introduce the panelists and lead the panel. Harold Brown, Air Force Secretary under McNamara and later Secretary of Defense under President James E. Carter, will talk about working with McNamara. Professor Emeritus George C. Herring of the University of Kentucky, one of the nation’s foremost experts on the history of the Vietnam War, will review the book. The author, Dr. Edward J. Drea, currently a contract historian in the Office of Joint History, Joint Chiefs of Staff, will respond to Secretary Brown’s and Professor Herring’s comments. The speakers’ presentations will be followed by a question and answer session and then a reception.

The event is free; reservations are not required. Seating is on a first-come, first-served basis. For this McGowan Theater event, doors to the building will open 30 minutes prior to the start of the program. Use the Special Events entrance on Constitution Avenue.

Thomas E. Ricks covered the U.S. military from 1991 to 2008 for the Wall Street Journal and then the Washington Post. He can be reached at ricksblogcomment@gmail.com. Twitter: @tomricks1

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