Students for a Free Tibet responds

On Monday, I posted some thoughts about the death of Adam "MCA" Yauch and the future of the global Tibetan independence movement. Tenzin Dorjee, executive director of Students for a Free Tibet, sent in this response:  The Tibetan Freedom concerts educated countless young people about Tibet, thousands of whom went on to become leaders and ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.

On Monday, I posted some thoughts about the death of Adam "MCA" Yauch and the future of the global Tibetan independence movement. Tenzin Dorjee, executive director of Students for a Free Tibet, sent in this response: 

On Monday, I posted some thoughts about the death of Adam "MCA" Yauch and the future of the global Tibetan independence movement. Tenzin Dorjee, executive director of Students for a Free Tibet, sent in this response: 

The Tibetan Freedom concerts educated countless young people about Tibet, thousands of whom went on to become leaders and organizers in Students for a Free Tibet, the group at the forefront of the protests against Chinese President-in-waiting Xi Jinping’s visit to Washington, DC in January 2012. 

The youth has always been a driving force behind nonviolent revolutions. We’ve witnessed this again in the uprisings that swept the Arab world. The youth movement for Tibet has not faded; it has deepened, taking root across Tibet where a new generation of young Tibetans are writing, blogging, protesting, agitating, and rising up against China’s colonial occupation. They know that Tibetans, not the West, will free Tibet. But allies in Western democracies can help us along the way by facilitating and speeding up the process.

Adam Yauch played a landmark role in building grassroots global solidarity for Tibet. This global solidarity, in turn, largely inspired the rebirth of hope in Tibet. This hope has breathed new life into the Tibetan resistance, which manifested itself in the 2008 uprising and the growing resistance movement that continues today. Therefore, Adam will be remembered not only for his brilliance as a musician but also for his unparalleled contribution to the movement that will bring about a free Tibet, and forever enshrine nonviolence as the most effective weapon against oppression.

Tenzin Dorjee
Executive Director of Students for a Free Tibet

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

Tag: Tibet

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