Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, May 11, 2012

In the run-up to Egypt’s long-awaited presidential election, Magdy Samaan takes to the streets to find out what his compatriots are thinking about the political situation. Jaime Suchlicki outlines the challenges that will face post-Castro Cuba and provides some handy tips on how to cope with them. In his column, Christian Caryl concludes that the ...

ANDREY SMIRNOV/AFP/GettyImages
ANDREY SMIRNOV/AFP/GettyImages
ANDREY SMIRNOV/AFP/GettyImages

In the run-up to Egypt's long-awaited presidential election, Magdy Samaan takes to the streets to find out what his compatriots are thinking about the political situation.

Jaime Suchlicki outlines the challenges that will face post-Castro Cuba and provides some handy tips on how to cope with them.

In his column, Christian Caryl concludes that the Russian protest movement presents little threat to Vladimir Putin's continued rule -- at least not yet.

In the run-up to Egypt’s long-awaited presidential election, Magdy Samaan takes to the streets to find out what his compatriots are thinking about the political situation.

Jaime Suchlicki outlines the challenges that will face post-Castro Cuba and provides some handy tips on how to cope with them.

In his column, Christian Caryl concludes that the Russian protest movement presents little threat to Vladimir Putin’s continued rule — at least not yet.

Peter Passell offers a user-friendly overview of some of the latest research on economic transitions.

Endy Bayuni reports on how Indonesians are using social media to rein in the power of the military, and reflects on President Yudhoyono’s mysterious decision to offer an apology for past human rights abuses.

Franciso Toro explores allegations that the Chavez regime is becoming entwined with drug mafias.

And Jackee Batanda explains why Ugandans feel threatened by the intensifying conflict between Sudan and South Sudan.

Plus, our recommended reads:

New York Times correspondent Robert Worth presents a riveting take on the fate of Qaddafi’s torturers in the new Libya.

Julia Pettengill of the Henry Jackson Society offers a study of Russia’s opposition movement and warns that a crackdown may be on the way (a protestor is detained by police in the photo above). At Salon.eu, Andrey Kurkov provides a sharp take on Ukraine’s political malaise.

Writing for OpenDemocracy.net, Fawaz Gerges analyzes the economic policies of the Islamist parties coming to the fore in the countries of the Arab Awakening — and discovers quite a few unimpeachable capitalists.

A new report from the International Crisis Group scrutinizes the problems facing Tunisia’s transition to democracy. A paper from the Council on Foreign Relations examines the rising power of Turkey and concludes that the U.S. should forge closer relations with Ankara.

And The Lede, the flagship blog of The New York Times, offers a fascinating look at political advertising in the Egyptian presidential campaign.

 

Twitter: @ccaryl

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