Finally, a fair review of Peter Beinart

I’m about halfway through Peter Beinart’s The Crisis of Zionism, and I’m finding it a fascinating read so far. There’s lots that’s familiar, of course, but Beinart is a fluid writer and his effort to reconcile liberal and Zionist ideals is admirable and courageous. As one would predict, his book has received the usual harsh ...

Walt-Steve-foreign-policy-columnist20
Walt-Steve-foreign-policy-columnist20
Stephen M. Walt
By , a columnist at Foreign Policy and the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international relations at Harvard University.
HAZEM BADER/AFP/GettyImages
HAZEM BADER/AFP/GettyImages
HAZEM BADER/AFP/GettyImages

I'm about halfway through Peter Beinart's The Crisis of Zionism, and I'm finding it a fascinating read so far. There's lots that's familiar, of course, but Beinart is a fluid writer and his effort to reconcile liberal and Zionist ideals is admirable and courageous.

As one would predict, his book has received the usual harsh treatment from those who cannot bear to have anyone criticize Israel or the behavior of major "pro-Israel" organizations here in the United States. By all means read the critiques -- which are often unconsciously revealing -- but make sure you also read Jerome Slater's superb review of Beinart on his own blog here. Slater's essay is the most insightful that I've seen so far, and he also shows just how intellectually bankrupt most of Beinart's critics are. In particular, some of the most prominent reviews simply ignored what Beinart actually says, preferring to lambaste strawmen of their own creation. Slater doesn't agree with everything Beinart says, but at least he's addressing what Beinart actually wrote.

I'll offer my own reactions once I've finished the book.

I’m about halfway through Peter Beinart’s The Crisis of Zionism, and I’m finding it a fascinating read so far. There’s lots that’s familiar, of course, but Beinart is a fluid writer and his effort to reconcile liberal and Zionist ideals is admirable and courageous.

As one would predict, his book has received the usual harsh treatment from those who cannot bear to have anyone criticize Israel or the behavior of major "pro-Israel" organizations here in the United States. By all means read the critiques — which are often unconsciously revealing — but make sure you also read Jerome Slater’s superb review of Beinart on his own blog here. Slater’s essay is the most insightful that I’ve seen so far, and he also shows just how intellectually bankrupt most of Beinart’s critics are. In particular, some of the most prominent reviews simply ignored what Beinart actually says, preferring to lambaste strawmen of their own creation. Slater doesn’t agree with everything Beinart says, but at least he’s addressing what Beinart actually wrote.

I’ll offer my own reactions once I’ve finished the book.

Stephen M. Walt is a columnist at Foreign Policy and the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international relations at Harvard University. Twitter: @stephenwalt

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