1 in 10 Brits think David Cameron could be an alien

It’s been a big week for Britain. Queen Elizabeth II is partying hard for her Diamond Jubilee, celebrating 60 years in power; the Olympic torch is making its way across the nation; and one out of 10 Britons suspect that this may all be happening under the leadership of an extraterrestrial. At least, that’s what a ...

Chip Somodevilla
Chip Somodevilla
Chip Somodevilla

It's been a big week for Britain. Queen Elizabeth II is partying hard for her Diamond Jubilee, celebrating 60 years in power; the Olympic torch is making its way across the nation; and one out of 10 Britons suspect that this may all be happening under the leadership of an extraterrestrial.

At least, that's what a new survey shows. Of the 1,089 respondents to the poll, which was released to accompany the launch of the new Men in Black video game, 10 percent said that British Prime Minister David Cameron could be an alien. U.S. President Barack Obama also made the top five list of possible aliens among us.

Cameron has seen his political fortunes sink in recent months after his Conservative Party responded to Britain's economic woes with an unpopular austerity budget, and he found himself embroiled in a scandal over a tax on meat pies, known as pasties. These gaffes have fed into the popular perception that he is “an arrogant, out-of-touch posh boy,” in the words of an MP from his own party.

It’s been a big week for Britain. Queen Elizabeth II is partying hard for her Diamond Jubilee, celebrating 60 years in power; the Olympic torch is making its way across the nation; and one out of 10 Britons suspect that this may all be happening under the leadership of an extraterrestrial.

At least, that’s what a new survey shows. Of the 1,089 respondents to the poll, which was released to accompany the launch of the new Men in Black video game, 10 percent said that British Prime Minister David Cameron could be an alien. U.S. President Barack Obama also made the top five list of possible aliens among us.

Cameron has seen his political fortunes sink in recent months after his Conservative Party responded to Britain’s economic woes with an unpopular austerity budget, and he found himself embroiled in a scandal over a tax on meat pies, known as pasties. These gaffes have fed into the popular perception that he is “an arrogant, out-of-touch posh boy,” in the words of an MP from his own party.

Wait, wait one second. Cameron is a highly intelligent, emotionally-detached being who pursues logical solutions without concern for the human toll they may take? That can only mean one thing. David Cameron is a Vulcan. Obama knows what we’re talking about.

This may sound far-fetched, but after all, the Pentagon is seemingly gearing up for an intergalactic battle by stocking up on space-age weapons — coincidence? We think not.

Cara Parks is deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. Prior to that she was the World editor at the Huffington Post. She is a graduate of Bard College and the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, and has written for The New Republic, Interview, Radar, and Publishers Weekly, among others. Twitter: @caraparks

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