Passport

Global public souring on Obama, not that interested in election

A new report from the Pew Global Attitudes Project shows that confidence in Barack Obama’s leadership has fallen in pretty much every country polled since 2009. While he remains pretty popular in Western Europe and similarly unpopular in the Middle East to when he took office, the most dramatic drop-offs have been in China and ...

627168_120613_obamapop.jpg

A new report from the Pew Global Attitudes Project shows that confidence in Barack Obama's leadership has fallen in pretty much every country polled since 2009. While he remains pretty popular in Western Europe and similarly unpopular in the Middle East to when he took office, the most dramatic drop-offs have been in China and Mexico. Interesting, the Japanese public seems to have developed a much more favorable opinion of the United States even as it's lost confidence in Obama:

 

I noted a Brooking Institution poll a few weeks ago showing the Egyptian public preferring Mitt Romney to Obama. It looks like much of the Muslim world is in that boat. Interestingly, despite Romney's fairly bellicose rhetoric in China, a plurality there say they don't want Obama re-elected: 

A new report from the Pew Global Attitudes Project shows that confidence in Barack Obama’s leadership has fallen in pretty much every country polled since 2009. While he remains pretty popular in Western Europe and similarly unpopular in the Middle East to when he took office, the most dramatic drop-offs have been in China and Mexico. Interesting, the Japanese public seems to have developed a much more favorable opinion of the United States even as it’s lost confidence in Obama:

 

I noted a Brooking Institution poll a few weeks ago showing the Egyptian public preferring Mitt Romney to Obama. It looks like much of the Muslim world is in that boat. Interestingly, despite Romney’s fairly bellicose rhetoric in China, a plurality there say they don’t want Obama re-elected: 

 

With the exception of China, every country polled shows far fewer people paying attention to this election than in 2008. The poll also shows that U.S. drone strikes are unpopular pretty much everywhere.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy  Twitter: @joshuakeating

More from Foreign Policy

Volker Perthes, U.N. special representative for Sudan, addresses the media in Khartoum, Sudan, on Jan. 10.

Sudan’s Future Hangs in the Balance

Demonstrators find themselves at odds with key U.N. and U.S. mediators.

In an aerial view, traffic creeps along Virginia Highway 1 after being diverted away from Interstate 95 after it was closed due to a winter storm.

Traffic Jams Are a Very American Disaster

The I-95 backup shows how easily highways can become traps.

Relatives and neighbors gather around a burned vehicle targeted and hit by an American drone strike in Kabul.

The Human Rights vs. National Security Dilemma Is a Fallacy

Advocacy organizations can’t protect human rights without challenging U.S. military support for tyrants and the corrupt influence of the defense industry and foreign governments.

un-sanctions-inspectors-china-foreign-policy-illustration

The Problem With Sanctions

From the White House to Turtle Bay, sanctions have never been more popular. But why are they so hard to make work?