Global public souring on Obama, not that interested in election

A new report from the Pew Global Attitudes Project shows that confidence in Barack Obama’s leadership has fallen in pretty much every country polled since 2009. While he remains pretty popular in Western Europe and similarly unpopular in the Middle East to when he took office, the most dramatic drop-offs have been in China and ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
627168_120613_obamapop.jpg
627168_120613_obamapop.jpg

A new report from the Pew Global Attitudes Project shows that confidence in Barack Obama's leadership has fallen in pretty much every country polled since 2009. While he remains pretty popular in Western Europe and similarly unpopular in the Middle East to when he took office, the most dramatic drop-offs have been in China and Mexico. Interesting, the Japanese public seems to have developed a much more favorable opinion of the United States even as it's lost confidence in Obama:

 

I noted a Brooking Institution poll a few weeks ago showing the Egyptian public preferring Mitt Romney to Obama. It looks like much of the Muslim world is in that boat. Interestingly, despite Romney's fairly bellicose rhetoric in China, a plurality there say they don't want Obama re-elected: 

A new report from the Pew Global Attitudes Project shows that confidence in Barack Obama’s leadership has fallen in pretty much every country polled since 2009. While he remains pretty popular in Western Europe and similarly unpopular in the Middle East to when he took office, the most dramatic drop-offs have been in China and Mexico. Interesting, the Japanese public seems to have developed a much more favorable opinion of the United States even as it’s lost confidence in Obama:

 

I noted a Brooking Institution poll a few weeks ago showing the Egyptian public preferring Mitt Romney to Obama. It looks like much of the Muslim world is in that boat. Interestingly, despite Romney’s fairly bellicose rhetoric in China, a plurality there say they don’t want Obama re-elected: 

 

With the exception of China, every country polled shows far fewer people paying attention to this election than in 2008. The poll also shows that U.S. drone strikes are unpopular pretty much everywhere.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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