Best Defense

Thomas E. Ricks' daily take on national security.

A good Army officer goes bad? Or slides back to his old ways? Either way, it’s sad

Capt. Charles Eadie, a previously enlisted soldier who graduated near the top of his West Point class in 2007, and then went to the London School of Economics, was busted and charged with selling anabolic steroids to an undercover police officer in Columbus, Georgia. He has pleaded not guilty.      Here is an interview he did ...

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Capt. Charles Eadie, a previously enlisted soldier who graduated near the top of his West Point class in 2007, and then went to the London School of Economics, was busted and charged with selling anabolic steroids to an undercover police officer in Columbus, Georgia. He has pleaded not guilty.     

Here is an interview he did about his career when he was deployed to Afghanistan in 2010. In it, he mentions that he had a "troubled past" and actually was on probation when he first tried to enlist. "There is definitely a darker path that I could have taken in life," he says, somewhat ominously.

You BD hardasses probably all want to throw the book at him. Maybe I am just a softie but I wonder if he was trying to feel the thrill of living close to the edge, a bit of the adrenaline of combat.

Capt. Charles Eadie, a previously enlisted soldier who graduated near the top of his West Point class in 2007, and then went to the London School of Economics, was busted and charged with selling anabolic steroids to an undercover police officer in Columbus, Georgia. He has pleaded not guilty.     

Here is an interview he did about his career when he was deployed to Afghanistan in 2010. In it, he mentions that he had a "troubled past" and actually was on probation when he first tried to enlist. "There is definitely a darker path that I could have taken in life," he says, somewhat ominously.

You BD hardasses probably all want to throw the book at him. Maybe I am just a softie but I wonder if he was trying to feel the thrill of living close to the edge, a bit of the adrenaline of combat.

Thomas E. Ricks covered the U.S. military from 1991 to 2008 for the Wall Street Journal and then the Washington Post. He can be reached at ricksblogcomment@gmail.com. Twitter: @tomricks1

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