Hong Kong TV station responds to FP’s Chinese moon article

Hong Kong’s Phoenix TV ran a segment on John Hickman’s recent Foreign Policy article which speculates on what might happen if China ever tried to annex territory on the moon. Titled "U.S Media Hypes That China Wants to Capture the Moon; United States Space Advantage has already been Destroyed," it opens with a shot of ...

Hong Kong's Phoenix TV ran a segment on John Hickman's recent Foreign Policy article which speculates on what might happen if China ever tried to annex territory on the moon. Titled "U.S Media Hypes That China Wants to Capture the Moon; United States Space Advantage has already been Destroyed," it opens with a shot of a Chinese space shuttle, dramatic music, and a white, martian-like character reading what appears to be a space newspaper. It then features an interview with Shao Yongling, a senior colonel from the PLA's Second Artillery Command College, who explains that "sour grapes" is the reason for the article. "Because of some economic problems," America's moon landing "could be delayed indefinitely"; that China will reach the moon soon, therefore, is "very provocative to Americans.” 

One expects her to deny China's desire to control the moon, but she never does. 

Hong Kong’s Phoenix TV ran a segment on John Hickman’s recent Foreign Policy article which speculates on what might happen if China ever tried to annex territory on the moon. Titled "U.S Media Hypes That China Wants to Capture the Moon; United States Space Advantage has already been Destroyed," it opens with a shot of a Chinese space shuttle, dramatic music, and a white, martian-like character reading what appears to be a space newspaper. It then features an interview with Shao Yongling, a senior colonel from the PLA’s Second Artillery Command College, who explains that "sour grapes" is the reason for the article. "Because of some economic problems," America’s moon landing "could be delayed indefinitely"; that China will reach the moon soon, therefore, is "very provocative to Americans.” 

One expects her to deny China’s desire to control the moon, but she never does. 

Isaac Stone Fish is a journalist and senior fellow at the Asia Society’s Center on U.S-China Relations. He was formerly the Asia editor at Foreign Policy Magazine. Twitter: @isaacstonefish

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