Mugabe takes another medical trip to Singapore

We may be in for another round of Robert Mugabe medical speculation with the 88-year-old president heading once again to Singapore for what senior officials are calling a "routine medical checkup." As Reuters reports, this is becoming a pretty regular occurrence:  State radio ZBC said Mugabe had gone for a review of an eye operation ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/GettyImages
JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/GettyImages
JEKESAI NJIKIZANA/AFP/GettyImages

We may be in for another round of Robert Mugabe medical speculation with the 88-year-old president heading once again to Singapore for what senior officials are calling a "routine medical checkup." As Reuters reports, this is becoming a pretty regular occurrence: 

State radio ZBC said Mugabe had gone for a review of an eye operation he had last year and denounced international media for exaggerating his health problems.

Local media reports say Mugabe travelled to Singapore eight times last year alone to seek medical attention.

We may be in for another round of Robert Mugabe medical speculation with the 88-year-old president heading once again to Singapore for what senior officials are calling a "routine medical checkup." As Reuters reports, this is becoming a pretty regular occurrence: 

State radio ZBC said Mugabe had gone for a review of an eye operation he had last year and denounced international media for exaggerating his health problems.

Local media reports say Mugabe travelled to Singapore eight times last year alone to seek medical attention.

A June 2008 U.S. diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks last year said Mugabe had prostate cancer that had spread to other organs. His doctor urged him to step down in 2008, according to the cable. In April, aides angrily denied reports by some international media that he was undergoing intensive treatment in a Singapore hospital and was fighting for his life.

It does seem odd that Mugabe’s officials consider it more embarrassing to admit that he has a serious medical condition than that he has so little faith in his country’s medical system that he would rather travel more than 5,000 miles than get a "routine checkup" from any Zimbabwean doctor.

In other autocrat medical news, a doctor working in Venezuela’s presidential palace has been arrested on suspicion of revealing state secrets. Dr. Ana Maria Abreu’s work involved treating disaster victims not the president, so it’s not clear if the arrest has anything to do with Hugo Chavez’s ongoing cancer treatment.  

 

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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