The return of French presidential family drama

The French may have thought that by trading in President Bling-Bling for Monsieur Normal, they were putting an end to the tabloid frenzy that often accompanied President Nicolas Sarkozy and Carla Bruni. They clearly didn’t take into account Hollande’s partner Valerie Trierweiler who caused a stir in June by picking a Twitter fight with the ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
PATRICK KOVARIK/AFP/GettyImages
PATRICK KOVARIK/AFP/GettyImages
PATRICK KOVARIK/AFP/GettyImages

The French may have thought that by trading in President Bling-Bling for Monsieur Normal, they were putting an end to the tabloid frenzy that often accompanied President Nicolas Sarkozy and Carla Bruni. They clearly didn't take into account Hollande's partner Valerie Trierweiler who caused a stir in June by picking a Twitter fight with the president's ex, Socialist Party politician Segolene Royal, who was locked in a tough reelection fight at the time. Now, Hollande's son is stepping into the fray

Thomas Hollande, 27, a lawyer, said the tweet had "stupefied" his father. "I knew she [Trierweiler] would do something one day, but not such a huge blow. It's staggering," the younger Hollande told the French newsmagazine Le Point.

"What I find reproachful about the tweet is that it put the private life into the public domain. It pained me on behalf of my father who absolutely detests anyone talking about his private life. It destroyed the normal image that he had constructed."[...]

The French may have thought that by trading in President Bling-Bling for Monsieur Normal, they were putting an end to the tabloid frenzy that often accompanied President Nicolas Sarkozy and Carla Bruni. They clearly didn’t take into account Hollande’s partner Valerie Trierweiler who caused a stir in June by picking a Twitter fight with the president’s ex, Socialist Party politician Segolene Royal, who was locked in a tough reelection fight at the time. Now, Hollande’s son is stepping into the fray

Thomas Hollande, 27, a lawyer, said the tweet had "stupefied" his father. "I knew she [Trierweiler] would do something one day, but not such a huge blow. It’s staggering," the younger Hollande told the French newsmagazine Le Point.

"What I find reproachful about the tweet is that it put the private life into the public domain. It pained me on behalf of my father who absolutely detests anyone talking about his private life. It destroyed the normal image that he had constructed."[…]

Thomas Hollande said it was "logical" that he, his brother and two sisters no longer wished to see Trierweiler.

"What’s important is that we normalize relations with our father," he said.

Hollande’s family drama still doesn’t really hold a candle to some of his predecessors,  but it should at least be enough to keep everyone occupied this silly season while Sarozy keeps a low profile

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.