Check out this girl crushing it on a skateboard in front of the Bamiyan Buddha craters

In 2001, the Taliban shocked and angered the world by destroying the Buddhas of Bamiyan,  800 year-old statues that the hardline group declared declare "un-Islamic" due to their depiction of the human form. A decade later, here’s a woman identified on the group’s Facebook page as Erika killing it in front of the craters that ...

Facebook/Skateistan
Facebook/Skateistan
Facebook/Skateistan

In 2001, the Taliban shocked and angered the world by destroying the Buddhas of Bamiyan,  800 year-old statues that the hardline group declared declare "un-Islamic" due to their depiction of the human form.

In 2001, the Taliban shocked and angered the world by destroying the Buddhas of Bamiyan,  800 year-old statues that the hardline group declared declare "un-Islamic" due to their depiction of the human form.

A decade later, here’s a woman identified on the group’s Facebook page as Erika killing it in front of the craters that were left behind. Erika is a volunteer for the group Skateistan, an international non-profit attempting to "use skateboarding as a tool for empowerment" and developers of Afghanistan’s first skateboarding school. The school welcomes both girls and boys to participate, even going so far as to open a private girls’ skating rink so that older students could continue to practice without men present. 

A spate of increased violence, and in particular the increase of Afghans dressed as security attacking U.S. forces, have frayed nerves throughout the country and brought renewed attention to the role of the U.S. mission. However, while it may be just one girl on a skateboard, the photo, besides being awesome, is a reminder that not all the news coming out of Afghanistan today is bad.

Cara Parks is deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. Prior to that she was the World editor at the Huffington Post. She is a graduate of Bard College and the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism, and has written for The New Republic, Interview, Radar, and Publishers Weekly, among others. Twitter: @caraparks

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