U.S. military reaches 2,000 dead in Afghanistan

Somber milestone According to a New York Times analysis of Department of Defense records, the number of U.S. armed forces killed in the war in Afghanistan reached 2,000 late last week (NYT).  The analysis shows that half of those 2,000 troops died in the last 27 months, one of every two died in the southern ...

Patrick Smith/Getty Images
Patrick Smith/Getty Images
Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Somber milestone

According to a New York Times analysis of Department of Defense records, the number of U.S. armed forces killed in the war in Afghanistan reached 2,000 late last week (NYT).  The analysis shows that half of those 2,000 troops died in the last 27 months, one of every two died in the southern province of Kandahar or Helmand, and the Marine Corps has suffered the highest fatality rate of any branch of the armed forces.

Drone wave

Somber milestone

According to a New York Times analysis of Department of Defense records, the number of U.S. armed forces killed in the war in Afghanistan reached 2,000 late last week (NYT).  The analysis shows that half of those 2,000 troops died in the last 27 months, one of every two died in the southern province of Kandahar or Helmand, and the Marine Corps has suffered the highest fatality rate of any branch of the armed forces.

Drone wave

A U.S. drone strike near Shnakhura village in North Waziristan on Tuesday killed between five and nine suspected militants, the third such attack in as many days (AP, ET, The News, AFP).

An Indian Border Security Force official said Wednesday that Pakistani paramilitary forces had violated a ceasefire by firing at three Indian border posts along the Jammu and Kashmir border on Tuesday evening, but that Indian troops had not responded and there was no loss of life or property damage (ET). The official claimed that Pakistan has violated the ceasefire 15 times in the past 18 days. Meanwhile, a delegation of Pakistani legislators and businessmen traveled to India on Wednesday to discuss bilateral trade and visa policies with their counterparts across the border (Dawn).

The Post’s Michele Langevine Leiby reports Wednesday on how Pakistan’s myriad economic problems appear to be making it increasingly difficult for employees across multiple sectors to get paid on time (Post). Newly hired doctors in Punjab Province (recruited to replace the doctors on strike to demand higher wages) say they have not been paid in six weeks, and last year the country’s train system was halted for days when Pakistan Railways employees staged a protest over their overdue wages.

Wake me up before you go, go

Flight attendants must have thought that a woman flying from Lahore to Paris on a recent Pakistan International Airways flight looked too peaceful to disturb (ET). The plane landed in France, where all other passengers disembarked, made its way to Italy, and then back to Lahore before the woman finally woke up.

— Jennifer Rowland

Jennifer Rowland is a research associate in the National Security Studies Program at the New America Foundation.

More from Foreign Policy

An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.
An illustration shows George Kennan, the father of Cold War containment strategy.

Is Cold War Inevitable?

A new biography of George Kennan, the father of containment, raises questions about whether the old Cold War—and the emerging one with China—could have been avoided.

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.
U.S. President Joe Biden speaks on the DISCLOSE Act.

So You Want to Buy an Ambassadorship

The United States is the only Western government that routinely rewards mega-donors with top diplomatic posts.

Chinese President Xi jinping  toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.
Chinese President Xi jinping toasts the guests during a banquet marking the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on September 30, 2019 in Beijing, China.

Can China Pull Off Its Charm Offensive?

Why Beijing’s foreign-policy reset will—or won’t—work out.

Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.
Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar chairs a meeting in Ankara, Turkey on Nov. 21, 2022.

Turkey’s Problem Isn’t Sweden. It’s the United States.

Erdogan has focused on Stockholm’s stance toward Kurdish exile groups, but Ankara’s real demand is the end of U.S. support for Kurds in Syria.