The Cable

The Cable goes inside the foreign policy machine, from Foggy Bottom to Turtle Bay, the White House to Embassy Row.

Photo of the Day: Aung San Suu Kyi meets Bo

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi scored a number of high level meetings during her whirlwind tour through Washington, including a private audience with the First Dog of the United States (FDOTUS) Bo. The White House released this photo of Suu Kyi and Bo’s Wednesday meeting in the Oval Office, which also included ...

623991_120920_Bo1.jpg
623991_120920_Bo1.jpg

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi scored a number of high level meetings during her whirlwind tour through Washington, including a private audience with the First Dog of the United States (FDOTUS) Bo.

The White House released this photo of Suu Kyi and Bo's Wednesday meeting in the Oval Office, which also included the participation of President Barack Obama, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and NSC Senior Director for Asia Danny Russel.

"President Obama met today with Burmese Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and expressed his admiration for her courage, determination and personal sacrifice in championing democracy and human rights over the years," the White House said in a readout of the meeting. "The President welcomed Burma's democratic transition and the recent progress made by Aung San Suu Kyi, as leader of the National League for Democracy Party, working together with President Thein Sein.  The President reaffirmed the determination of the United States to support their sustained efforts to promote political and economic reforms and to ensure full protection of the fundamental rights of the Burmese people.  The President expressed his conviction that the ongoing process of reconciliation and reform offers the people of that nation the opportunity to take charge of their destiny and to shape a more peaceful, free, and prosperous future."

Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi scored a number of high level meetings during her whirlwind tour through Washington, including a private audience with the First Dog of the United States (FDOTUS) Bo.

The White House released this photo of Suu Kyi and Bo’s Wednesday meeting in the Oval Office, which also included the participation of President Barack Obama, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and NSC Senior Director for Asia Danny Russel.

“President Obama met today with Burmese Nobel Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi and expressed his admiration for her courage, determination and personal sacrifice in championing democracy and human rights over the years,” the White House said in a readout of the meeting. “The President welcomed Burma’s democratic transition and the recent progress made by Aung San Suu Kyi, as leader of the National League for Democracy Party, working together with President Thein Sein.  The President reaffirmed the determination of the United States to support their sustained efforts to promote political and economic reforms and to ensure full protection of the fundamental rights of the Burmese people.  The President expressed his conviction that the ongoing process of reconciliation and reform offers the people of that nation the opportunity to take charge of their destiny and to shape a more peaceful, free, and prosperous future.”

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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