The Cable

Treasury won’t share daily economic briefing with State

Each morning, the U.S. Treasury Department compiles a daily economic briefing for the president, but Treasury recently denied the State Department’s request to see the product. The request for the daily brief came from the State Department’s new chief economist, Heidi Crebo-Rediker, who became the first official to hold that title when Secretary of State ...

Each morning, the U.S. Treasury Department compiles a daily economic briefing for the president, but Treasury recently denied the State Department’s request to see the product.

The request for the daily brief came from the State Department’s new chief economist, Heidi Crebo-Rediker, who became the first official to hold that title when Secretary of State Hillary Clinton created the position in February. She made the request to her counterpart, Jan Eberly, Treasury’s assistant secretary for economic policy, State Department and Treasury Department sources confirmed to The Cable.

Treasury told State that the product goes only to the president, not to any other departments, so the decision to decline State’s request was not specific to Foggy Bottom, one official said. That’s different from the Presidential Daily Brief, for example, which is given to other high-level officials, including Clinton. The Treasury’s product is not intelligence-based, but more a wrap-up of how Treasury sees the economic and trade news of the day.

A Treasury official told The Cable that that there is a regular exchange of economic data and analysis and close collaboration between Treasury and State. The official pointed to Rediker’s invitation to Eberly last month to conduct a web briefing from State for Foreign Service officers at U.S. embassies on the state of the U.S. economy.

State Department spokesman Philippe Reines also told The Cable that overall, the economic information-sharing relationship between State and Treasury is robust.

"Secretary Clinton has made economic statecraft a top priority, including naming the department’s first chief economist. So State & Treasury are fully synched on a wide range of economic issues of mutual interest and importance to the United States, including between the secretaries themselves," Reines said. "That obviously includes the annual Strategic & Economic Dialogue with China, as well as a constant exchanging of reports and market data to help both agencies execute their missions."

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