JIEDDO turns its attention to the sea

Killer Apps focuses a lot on cyber, UAVs, advanced spy gear and other high-tech signatures of modern warfare, but IEDs have so far this century been as much a hallmark of warfare as drones. Now, as the Pentagon shifts its focus toward combat in the world’s busiest sea lanes, it’s looking to protect itself from ...

Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons

Killer Apps focuses a lot on cyber, UAVs, advanced spy gear and other high-tech signatures of modern warfare, but IEDs have so far this century been as much a hallmark of warfare as drones. Now, as the Pentagon shifts its focus toward combat in the world's busiest sea lanes, it's looking to protect itself from water-borne IEDs. 

Here's a little of what FP's Gordon Lubold had to say about the project (that has a motto of "remember the Cole") in his Situation Report email this morning.

The particulars of the technologies funded by the three new contracts are largely classified and get wonky in a hurry. The Mobile Cueing with In-Volume and Bottom Search (MCIBS), the Swimmer Threat Identification System (STID), and the Sensor-Based Stabilized Remotely Operated Vehicle Waterborne-IED Identification and Neutralization (SSR-WIN) systems are all in accelerated development and might see the water within 12 months.

Killer Apps focuses a lot on cyber, UAVs, advanced spy gear and other high-tech signatures of modern warfare, but IEDs have so far this century been as much a hallmark of warfare as drones. Now, as the Pentagon shifts its focus toward combat in the world’s busiest sea lanes, it’s looking to protect itself from water-borne IEDs. 

Here’s a little of what FP’s Gordon Lubold had to say about the project (that has a motto of "remember the Cole") in his Situation Report email this morning.

The particulars of the technologies funded by the three new contracts are largely classified and get wonky in a hurry. The Mobile Cueing with In-Volume and Bottom Search (MCIBS), the Swimmer Threat Identification System (STID), and the Sensor-Based Stabilized Remotely Operated Vehicle Waterborne-IED Identification and Neutralization (SSR-WIN) systems are all in accelerated development and might see the water within 12 months.

They are funded to the tune of about $20 million total by the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization, or JIEDDO, which until now has been largely focused on land-based threats posed by IEDs and other devices.

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John Reed is a national security reporter for Foreign Policy. He comes to FP after editing Military.com’s publication Defense Tech and working as the associate editor of DoDBuzz. Between 2007 and 2010, he covered major trends in military aviation and the defense industry around the world for Defense News and Inside the Air Force. Before moving to Washington in August 2007, Reed worked in corporate sales and business development for a Swedish IT firm, The Meltwater Group in Mountain View CA, and Philadelphia, PA. Prior to that, he worked as a reporter at the Tracy Press and the Scotts Valley Press-Banner newspapers in California. His first story as a professional reporter involved chasing escaped emus around California’s central valley with Mexican cowboys armed with lassos and local police armed with shotguns. Luckily for the giant birds, the cowboys caught them first and the emus were ok. A New England native, Reed graduated from the University of New Hampshire with a dual degree in international affairs and history.

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