Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, Oct. 19, 2012

Writing from Libya, Christopher Stephen offers a forensic analysis of the Benghazi consulate attack. Syrian dissident Ahed Al Hendi recalls what it was like growing up under the personality cult surrounding the Assads. Christian Caryl examines little-noticed corners of the Arab world where the spirit of rebellion continues to smolder. Jon Temin explains why Sudan’s ...

ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/GettyImages
ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/GettyImages
ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/GettyImages

Writing from Libya, Christopher Stephen offers a forensic analysis of the Benghazi consulate attack.

Syrian dissident Ahed Al Hendi recalls what it was like growing up under the personality cult surrounding the Assads.

Christian Caryl examines little-noticed corners of the Arab world where the spirit of rebellion continues to smolder.

Writing from Libya, Christopher Stephen offers a forensic analysis of the Benghazi consulate attack.

Syrian dissident Ahed Al Hendi recalls what it was like growing up under the personality cult surrounding the Assads.

Christian Caryl examines little-noticed corners of the Arab world where the spirit of rebellion continues to smolder.

Jon Temin explains why Sudan’s governance problems are too deep to be cured by concessions to breakaway regions.

Guest blogger Maikel Nabil Sanad casts a critical eye on Mideast potentates who are using blasphemy laws to silence critics.

Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez analyzes the factors influencing Venezuelans’ decisions to emigrate after the Hugo Chávez victory in this month’s presidential election.

Katrina Lantos Swett and Robert P. George make the case for keeping post-revolutionary constitutions in the Arab World free of blasphemy laws.

Jackee Batanda observes plans by the Ugandan security forces to crack down on the country’s social media.

And Endy Bayuni writes about the political strategy behind Indonesia’s creeping liberalization of laws on capital punishment.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

In a new paper from the Brookings Doha Center, Salman Shaikh proposes a path forward toward a solution to Syria’s deepening crisis.

The Inter American Press Association warns of a rising threat to press freedom from authoritarian governments and violence across Latin America.

Democracy Digest analyzes a political assassination in Tunisia that could have a profound effect on the course of the revolution.

As talk grows of a possible military intervention in Mali, the Council on Foreign Relations offers a useful backgrounder on Al-Qaeda in the Maghreb. (The photo above shows Tuareg fighters in northern Mali.)

The Duck of Minerva blog hosts an impassioned debate on the role of sexual violence in warfare, with Andrew Mack responding to a post from Megan MacKenzie.

An intriguing blog post from The Economist describes the crucial differences in local government around India.

Ivan Krastev reflects on the importance of trust in democracies in a recent TED talk.

Courtesy of The Atlantic.com, Russian dissident Sergei Udaltsov live-tweets his detention.

And finally, be sure to check out this thought-provoking obituary of Cambodia’s King Sihanouk, who died this week at age 89.

Twitter: @ccaryl
Neha Paliwal is the Editorial Assistant for Democracy Lab.

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