Our favorite election articles of 2012

While we count down the hours until the polls open, relive 2012 with the best of FP‘s coverage: Blue Planet What if the world could vote in the U.S. election? By Uri Friedman, Oct. 31 Meet Sandy, the Game Changer The storm could upend American politics — if we’re lucky By David Rothkopf, Oct. 29 ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images
SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images

While we count down the hours until the polls open, relive 2012 with the best of FP's coverage:

While we count down the hours until the polls open, relive 2012 with the best of FP‘s coverage:

Blue Planet
What if the world could vote in the U.S. election?
By Uri Friedman, Oct. 31

Meet Sandy, the Game Changer
The storm could upend American politics — if we’re lucky
By David Rothkopf, Oct. 29

Clicking This Will Make You Stupider
The 10 worst foreign-policy campaign ads of 2012.
By Uri Friedman and Ty McCormick, Oct. 25

Who Said It: Barack Obama or Mitt Romney?
With election day approaching, how well do you know the two candidates on foreign policy?
By Joshua E. Keating and Uri Friedman, Oct. 24

In Praise of Apathy
It’s time to stop deriding the Americans who refuse to vote. They’re trying to tell us something.
By Christian Caryl, Oct. 24

Silent Treatment
The biggest global issues that weren’t discussed at the debates. 
By Joshua E. Keating, Oct. 23

The Case for Intervention…
In Obama’s dysfunctional foreign policy team.
By Rosa Brooks, Oct. 18

Don’t Assume Iran Is the Greatest Threat
Five other dangers that deserve our immediate attention.
By Daniel Byman, Oct. 17

Red State
Why China wants Mitt Romney to win.
By Shen Dingli, Oct. 17

What the Frack?!
How the 2012 election could come down to one thing: coal.
By David Roberts, Oct. 16

The Biden Doctrine
How the vice president is shaping Obama’s foreign policy.
By James Traub, Oct. 19

Game Change: China Edition
What if American political reporters covered the Chinese horse race?
By Isaac Stone Fish, Oct. 4

Mr. 3.75 Percent
Paul Ryan wants to cut federal discretionary spending to the level of Equatorial Guinea. 
By Daniel Altman, Oct. 1

An Open Letter to the United States of America
Some unsolicited thoughts from an Egyptian revolutionary.
By Mahmoud Salem, Sept. 19

Yes, Russia Is Our Top Geopolitical Foe
Why Mitt Romney is right about Moscow.
By John Arquilla, Sept. 17

R Is for Reckless
Why the Republicans can’t be trusted with national security. 
By John Kerry, Sept. 4

Leading from the Front
It’s time for some straight talk about the world, Mr. President.
By John McCain, Aug. 28

Uncultured
Mitt Romney doesn’t know much about economy history. 
By Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson, Aug. 1

Hope, But No Change
Why has Obama abandoned the one country in Africa he promised to help?
By Mvemba Phezo Dizolele, July 16

Romney: Year One
What would happen if you took Mitt Romney’s foreign-policy promises extremely literally?
By Daniel Drezner, May 25

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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