Stephen M. Walt

Yes, Virginia, the election is almost over….

Today we’re all obsessed with — and exhausted by — the U.S. election. There’s a lot wrong with America’s political institutions — starting with the absurd Electoral College — but right up there with the EC is the ridiculous length of the campaign season itself. No other modern democracy spends at least twenty-five percent of ...

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/GettyImages
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/GettyImages

Today we’re all obsessed with — and exhausted by — the U.S. election. There’s a lot wrong with America’s political institutions — starting with the absurd Electoral College — but right up there with the EC is the ridiculous length of the campaign season itself. No other modern democracy spends at least twenty-five percent of a presidential term determining who the next president will be, and this feature both inflates the cost of elections (thereby increasing the clout of well-heeled donors and lobbies) and distracts us all from the broader issues of the moment. All that’s keeping us going now is the knowledge that it will soon be over.

Unlike my FP colleague Dan Drezner, I’m not going to offer a lengthy election endorsement. If you’ve been reading this blog and can’t tell who I’m voting for, you haven’t been paying attention. I’ve been disappointed by some of Obama’s foreign policy decisions — most notably his caving on the Middle East peace process and his decision to escalate in Afghanistan — but I didn’t expect a lot of dramatic foreign policy successes during the first term anyway. Unlike Dan (and Rosa Brooks), I don’t think a better process would have made that much difference: Once you had populated the administration with the usual Democratic party wonks, you were going to get the usual post-Clintonian Democratic party foreign policy. Not realism, in other words, but good old-fashioned liberal interventionism suitably sobered by the Iraq debacle and the financial crisis. Obama has scored some limited successes, has avoided big disasters (like an attack on Iran) and has for the most part dealt with friends and foes in a sensible way. In the absence of a better alternative — and such an alternative is clearly absent — he gets my vote.

What makes it easy is looking at the other side. The Romney campaign’s critique of Obama’s foreign policy is about as factually accurate as its fairy budget proposals. It’s also schizophrenic: The Romney campaign wants you to think Obama has been too hard on our allies and too easy on our foes, yet in the third debate Romney agreed with almost all of Obama’s policies. Moreover, his campaign’s reliance on a bunch of neoconservative retreads tells you he’s either craven or a bad judge of talent, and neither is an especially appealing quality for a future leader. If you’re still undecided, all you need to do is contrast Obama’s pitch-perfect foreign tour in 2008 with the gaffe and pander-filled Romney tour last summer. On foreign policy grounds, therefore, this decision is a no-brainer.

Stephen M. Walt is the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international relations at Harvard University.

Trending Now Sponsored Links by Taboola

By Taboola

More from Foreign Policy

By Taboola