Report: Kerry up for SecDef

A new name has emerged among top candidates to succeed Leon Panetta as secretary of defense: Sen. John Kerry (D-MA). According to the Washington Post, Kerry is under consideration because he is losing out to United Nations Ambassador Susan Rice in the shuffle to succeed Hillary Clinton as secretary of state. Kerry has long been ...

Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Photo by Nikki Kahn/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A new name has emerged among top candidates to succeed Leon Panetta as secretary of defense: Sen. John Kerry (D-MA).

A new name has emerged among top candidates to succeed Leon Panetta as secretary of defense: Sen. John Kerry (D-MA).

According to the Washington Post, Kerry is under consideration because he is losing out to United Nations Ambassador Susan Rice in the shuffle to succeed Hillary Clinton as secretary of state.

Kerry has long been described as wanting the  Foggy Bottom post, but the Vietnam veteran/protestor’s name to head the Pentagon is a surprise in the E-Ring.

Read more here.

Kevin Baron is a national security reporter for Foreign Policy, covering defense and military issues in Washington. He is also vice president of the Pentagon Press Association. Baron previously was a national security staff writer for National Journal, covering the "business of war." Prior to that, Baron worked in the resident daily Pentagon press corps as a reporter/photographer for Stars and Stripes. For three years with Stripes, Baron covered the building and traveled overseas extensively with the secretary of defense and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, covering official visits to Afghanistan and Iraq, the Middle East and Europe, China, Japan and South Korea, in more than a dozen countries. From 2004 to 2009, Baron was the Boston Globe Washington bureau's investigative projects reporter, covering defense, international affairs, lobbying and other issues. Before that, he muckraked at the Center for Public Integrity. Baron has reported on assignment from Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, the Middle East and the South Pacific. He was won two Polk Awards, among other honors. He has a B.A. in international studies from the University of Richmond and M.A. in media and public affairs from George Washington University. Originally from Orlando, Fla., Baron has lived in the Washington area since 1998 and currently resides in Northern Virginia with his wife, three sons, and the family dog, The Edge. Twitter: @FPBaron

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