No Chickens or Cricket Bats

The strange list of Indian products you can't import in Pakistan.

ROB ELLIOTT/AFP/Getty Images
ROB ELLIOTT/AFP/Getty Images
ROB ELLIOTT/AFP/Getty Images

As of March 2012, there were 1,209 items on the Pakistani Ministry of Commerce's "negative list" of goods that cannot be imported from India. The list is set to be eliminated by the end of the year as a result of recently signed trade agreements. But for now, here are a few highlights, from toothpaste to toilet paper, of what's still banned:

1. Fowls of the species Gallus domesticus (chickens)

As of March 2012, there were 1,209 items on the Pakistani Ministry of Commerce’s "negative list" of goods that cannot be imported from India. The list is set to be eliminated by the end of the year as a result of recently signed trade agreements. But for now, here are a few highlights, from toothpaste to toilet paper, of what’s still banned:

1. Fowls of the species Gallus domesticus (chickens)

11. Cigars, cheroots, and cigarillos, containing tobacco

70. Eyedrops

88. Eau de Cologne

91. Toothpaste

165. Baths, shower-baths, sinks, and wash basins

187. Synthetic floats for fishing nets

310. Thermal fax paper

321. Toilet paper

324. Diapers for adults of weight exceeding 25 kg

831. Fruit mixers

867. Coffee or tea makers

1,080. Baby carriages and parts thereof

1,136. Dentists’ chairs

1,155. Badminton rackets

1,165.Badminton shuttlecocks

1,177. Cricket bats

1,178. Cricket wickets

Alicia P.Q. Wittmeyer is the Europe editor at Foreign Policy. Her work has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, and Forbes, among other places. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and master’s degrees from Peking University and the London School of Economics. The P.Q. stands for Ping-Quon.

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