Launch Your Own Gaza War

Help us field-test 'A Reign of Missiles.'

By , a defense writer.
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

Wargame designer Paul Rohrbaugh has just created a board game based on the recent Israel-Hamas conflict. He is playtesting "A Reign of Missiles" to tweak the rules, and he wants your suggestions on how to improve it.

"A Reign of Missiles" is a simple game in which the player steps into the shoes of the Israeli military command as it tries to stop Hamas rockets from striking Israeli cities. The player controls Israeli air, ground, and naval forces, as well as the Iron Dome missile defense system, while the game itself uses dice rolls to control Hamas forces. Winning the game means suppressing Hamas' rocket capabilities, but applying too much force will draw international condemnation and cost Israel the game. It's a narrow balancing act for the Israelis in "A Reign of Missiles," which is based on Paul's earlier game on the German V-1 buzz bomb offensive against England in 1944.

"A Reign of Missiles" is a print-and-play game, meaning that the map, playing pieces, and rules are in three small PDF files that you can print out yourself. (Paul, the owner of High Flying Dice Games, has graciously allowed FP to host the files, which you can download below.) All you need is a printer (color is best) at home or the office, although it only cost me a dollar to print out the map and pieces at FedEx Kinko's. You'll also need scissors to cut out the playing pieces and a 10-sided die. If you don't have dice, use a random number generator (set for 0 to 9) for your PC, iPhone, or Android phone.

Wargame designer Paul Rohrbaugh has just created a board game based on the recent Israel-Hamas conflict. He is playtesting "A Reign of Missiles" to tweak the rules, and he wants your suggestions on how to improve it.

"A Reign of Missiles" is a simple game in which the player steps into the shoes of the Israeli military command as it tries to stop Hamas rockets from striking Israeli cities. The player controls Israeli air, ground, and naval forces, as well as the Iron Dome missile defense system, while the game itself uses dice rolls to control Hamas forces. Winning the game means suppressing Hamas’ rocket capabilities, but applying too much force will draw international condemnation and cost Israel the game. It’s a narrow balancing act for the Israelis in "A Reign of Missiles," which is based on Paul’s earlier game on the German V-1 buzz bomb offensive against England in 1944.

"A Reign of Missiles" is a print-and-play game, meaning that the map, playing pieces, and rules are in three small PDF files that you can print out yourself. (Paul, the owner of High Flying Dice Games, has graciously allowed FP to host the files, which you can download below.) All you need is a printer (color is best) at home or the office, although it only cost me a dollar to print out the map and pieces at FedEx Kinko’s. You’ll also need scissors to cut out the playing pieces and a 10-sided die. If you don’t have dice, use a random number generator (set for 0 to 9) for your PC, iPhone, or Android phone.

FP will collect the most useful suggestions (and we mean most useful to the game, not the most abusive toward either side in the conflict) and post them later. You can enter your suggestions in the comments section below, or send them to me at michael.peck1@gmail.com. Remember that "A Reign of Missiles" is only a work in progress, and you can help shape the final product.

You can download the rules, game board, and pieces here, here, and here.

Rules

A Reign of Missiles rules revised November 26 2012.pdf

 

Game Board

A Reign of Missiles Map

 

Game Counters

A Reign of Missiles Counters Revised November 26 2012

Michael Peck is a defense writer. He is a contributor to Forbes Defense, editor of Uncommon Defense, and senior analyst for Wikistrat. Twitter: @Mipeck1

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