Daniel W. Drezner

Nominations are now open for the 2012 Albies

It’s now December, which means it’s time to start garnering nominations for the 4th annual Albies, so named to honor of the great political economist Albert O. Hirschman.  To reiterate the criteria for what merits an Albie nomination: I’m talking about any book, journal article, magazine piece, op-ed, or blog post published in the [last] calendar ...

It's now December, which means it's time to start garnering nominations for the 4th annual Albies, so named to honor of the great political economist Albert O. Hirschman

To reiterate the criteria for what merits an Albie nomination:

I'm talking about any book, journal article, magazine piece, op-ed, or blog post published in the [last] calendar year that made you rethink how the world works in such a way that you will never be able "unthink" the argument.

It’s now December, which means it’s time to start garnering nominations for the 4th annual Albies, so named to honor of the great political economist Albert O. Hirschman

To reiterate the criteria for what merits an Albie nomination:

I’m talking about any book, journal article, magazine piece, op-ed, or blog post published in the [last] calendar year that made you rethink how the world works in such a way that you will never be able "unthink" the argument.

This year was certainly not a boring one for the actual global political economy, which means it’s a good year to write about it.  So, please submit your ideas to me.  And remember, this is the only year-end Top 10 list that neither Time nor the Atlantic has yet to comandeer.  Here are links to my 2009, 2010, and 2011 lists for reference. 

The winners will be announced, as is now tradition, on December 31st.  In the meantime, readers are strongly encouraged to submit their nominations (with links if possible) in the comments.

Daniel W. Drezner is a professor of international politics at Tufts University’s Fletcher School. He blogged regularly for Foreign Policy from 2009 to 2014. Twitter: @dandrezner

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