Borderlands

Globalization hasn’t killed borders; it’s made them more interesting. We commissioned three leading writers to travel the world’s most impenetrable fault lines, the global gray zones where countries and people — and our often flawed ideas about them — meet. And this year FP and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is publishing ebooks with ...

615781_121230_BorderlandsBanner5.jpg
615781_121230_BorderlandsBanner5.jpg

Globalization hasn't killed borders; it's made them more interesting. We commissioned three leading writers to travel the world's most impenetrable fault lines, the global gray zones where countries and people -- and our often flawed ideas about them -- meet. And this year FP and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is publishing ebooks with stories from these critical frontiers, starting with Peter Chilson's We Never Knew Exactly Where: Dispatches From the Lost Country of Mali and Matthieu Aikins's Bird of Chaman, Flower of the Khyber: Riding Shotgun From Karachi to Kabul in a Pakistani Truck.

You can also read excerpts from the books in our January/February issue below to follow the surprises these writers found, from the coup that awaited Chilson in Mali, once an African model of democracy, to Matthieu Aikins's wild, smoke-filled journey over the Hindu Kush in a Pakistani truck. And we begin and end with Louie Palu's powerful photography from the U.S.-Mexico border as you've never seen it before -- all with an introduction by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, just as he sets off on his own seven-year journey tracing early humans' first cross-border trek.

Globalization hasn’t killed borders; it’s made them more interesting. We commissioned three leading writers to travel the world’s most impenetrable fault lines, the global gray zones where countries and people — and our often flawed ideas about them — meet. And this year FP and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is publishing ebooks with stories from these critical frontiers, starting with Peter Chilson’s We Never Knew Exactly Where: Dispatches From the Lost Country of Mali and Matthieu Aikins’s Bird of Chaman, Flower of the Khyber: Riding Shotgun From Karachi to Kabul in a Pakistani Truck.

You can also read excerpts from the books in our January/February issue below to follow the surprises these writers found, from the coup that awaited Chilson in Mali, once an African model of democracy, to Matthieu Aikins’s wild, smoke-filled journey over the Hindu Kush in a Pakistani truck. And we begin and end with Louie Palu’s powerful photography from the U.S.-Mexico border as you’ve never seen it before — all with an introduction by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, just as he sets off on his own seven-year journey tracing early humans’ first cross-border trek.

stripes

EBOOKS

  • We Never Knew Exactly Where
    By Peter Chilson

  • Bird of Chaman, Flower of the Khyber
    By Matthieu Aikins

stripes

EXCERPTS

  • Edge of the World
    By Paul Salopek

  • Rebel Country
    By Peter Chilson

  • The War Before the Last War
    By Graeme Wood

  • Stowaway
    By Matthieu Aikins

  • La Frontera
    By Louie Palu

Facebook|Twitter|Digg

More from Foreign Policy

A worker cuts the nose off the last Ukraine's Tupolev-22M3, the Soviet-made strategic aircraft able to carry nuclear weapons at a military base in Poltava, Ukraine on Jan. 27, 2006. A total of 60 aircraft were destroyed  according to the USA-Ukrainian disarmament agreement.
A worker cuts the nose off the last Ukraine's Tupolev-22M3, the Soviet-made strategic aircraft able to carry nuclear weapons at a military base in Poltava, Ukraine on Jan. 27, 2006. A total of 60 aircraft were destroyed according to the USA-Ukrainian disarmament agreement.

Why Do People Hate Realism So Much?

The school of thought doesn’t explain everything—but its proponents foresaw the potential for conflict over Ukraine long before it erupted.

Employees watch a cargo ship at a port in China, which is experiencing an economic downturn.
Employees watch a cargo ship at a port in China, which is experiencing an economic downturn.

China’s Crisis of Confidence

What if, instead of being a competitor, China can no longer afford to compete at all?

Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies in the U.S. Senate in Washington on Sept. 24, 2020.
Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell testifies in the U.S. Senate in Washington on Sept. 24, 2020.

Why This Global Economic Crisis Is Different

This is the first time since World War II that there may be no cooperative way out.

Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Premier Li Keqiang applaud at the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 11.
Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) and Premier Li Keqiang applaud at the closing session of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 11.

China Is Hardening Itself for Economic War

Beijing is trying to close economic vulnerabilities out of fear of U.S. containment.