Special Report

Borderlands

Globalization hasn’t killed borders; it’s made them more interesting. We commissioned three leading writers to travel the world’s most impenetrable fault lines, the global gray zones where countries and people — and our often flawed ideas about them — meet. And this year FP and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is publishing ebooks with ...

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Globalization hasn't killed borders; it's made them more interesting. We commissioned three leading writers to travel the world's most impenetrable fault lines, the global gray zones where countries and people -- and our often flawed ideas about them -- meet. And this year FP and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is publishing ebooks with stories from these critical frontiers, starting with Peter Chilson's We Never Knew Exactly Where: Dispatches From the Lost Country of Mali and Matthieu Aikins's Bird of Chaman, Flower of the Khyber: Riding Shotgun From Karachi to Kabul in a Pakistani Truck.

You can also read excerpts from the books in our January/February issue below to follow the surprises these writers found, from the coup that awaited Chilson in Mali, once an African model of democracy, to Matthieu Aikins's wild, smoke-filled journey over the Hindu Kush in a Pakistani truck. And we begin and end with Louie Palu's powerful photography from the U.S.-Mexico border as you've never seen it before -- all with an introduction by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, just as he sets off on his own seven-year journey tracing early humans' first cross-border trek.

Globalization hasn’t killed borders; it’s made them more interesting. We commissioned three leading writers to travel the world’s most impenetrable fault lines, the global gray zones where countries and people — and our often flawed ideas about them — meet. And this year FP and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting is publishing ebooks with stories from these critical frontiers, starting with Peter Chilson’s We Never Knew Exactly Where: Dispatches From the Lost Country of Mali and Matthieu Aikins’s Bird of Chaman, Flower of the Khyber: Riding Shotgun From Karachi to Kabul in a Pakistani Truck.

You can also read excerpts from the books in our January/February issue below to follow the surprises these writers found, from the coup that awaited Chilson in Mali, once an African model of democracy, to Matthieu Aikins’s wild, smoke-filled journey over the Hindu Kush in a Pakistani truck. And we begin and end with Louie Palu’s powerful photography from the U.S.-Mexico border as you’ve never seen it before — all with an introduction by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Paul Salopek, just as he sets off on his own seven-year journey tracing early humans’ first cross-border trek.

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EBOOKS

  • We Never Knew Exactly Where
    By Peter Chilson

  • Bird of Chaman, Flower of the Khyber
    By Matthieu Aikins

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EXCERPTS

  • Edge of the World
    By Paul Salopek

  • Rebel Country
    By Peter Chilson

  • The War Before the Last War
    By Graeme Wood

  • Stowaway
    By Matthieu Aikins

  • La Frontera
    By Louie Palu

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