Iran successfully sends monkey into space

Forget nuclear ducks. This morning Iran revealed its latest science and technology development: a space monkey.  According to Iran’s Al-Alam TV, a monkey, launched in a Kavoshgar rocket, successfully reached a height of 120 kilometers, before returning safely to earth. This launch comes on the heels of a tragic failed attempt to send a monkey ...

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Forget nuclear ducks. This morning Iran revealed its latest science and technology development: a space monkey.  According to Iran's Al-Alam TV, a monkey, launched in a Kavoshgar rocket, successfully reached a height of 120 kilometers, before returning safely to earth.

This launch comes on the heels of a tragic failed attempt to send a monkey into space in October of 2011. After having successfully launched a turtle, a mouse, worms, and even a monkey doll into space, Iran's first actual monkey did not return alive. 

These forays into space travel have prompted Western concerns that this is all really part of Iran's growing nuclear program:

Forget nuclear ducks. This morning Iran revealed its latest science and technology development: a space monkey.  According to Iran’s Al-Alam TV, a monkey, launched in a Kavoshgar rocket, successfully reached a height of 120 kilometers, before returning safely to earth.

This launch comes on the heels of a tragic failed attempt to send a monkey into space in October of 2011. After having successfully launched a turtle, a mouse, worms, and even a monkey doll into space, Iran’s first actual monkey did not return alive. 

These forays into space travel have prompted Western concerns that this is all really part of Iran’s growing nuclear program:

Western countries are concerned the long-range ballistic technology used to propel Iranian satellites into orbit could be used to launch atomic warheads. Tehran denies such suggestions and says its nuclear work is purely peaceful.

Iran joins a long list of countries who have employed monkeys and other mammals to bravely go where no man has gone before, including the US, China, France, and Russia. Unlike these other countries, Iran doesn’t seem to name their animals. Maybe it’s better not to get too attached.

Marya Hannun is a Ph.D. student in Arabic and Islamic studies at Georgetown University. Follow her on Twitter at: @mrhannun.

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