Psy performs at South Korean inauguration

By all accounts, the inauguration of South Korean President Park Geun-hye on Monday was a stately affair — that is, until the rapper Psy took the stage. "I know this is a very formal event, but if you could please stand up and join me for the horse dance, it would be great," the South ...

JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images
JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images
JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images

By all accounts, the inauguration of South Korean President Park Geun-hye on Monday was a stately affair -- that is, until the rapper Psy took the stage. "I know this is a very formal event, but if you could please stand up and join me for the horse dance, it would be great," the South Korean artist told the crowd (and all we got was a lip-sync controversy?). The Guardian is characterizing the performance as a "family-friendly version" of Gangnam Style. Here's the video:

During the South Korean presidential election, Psy didn't publicly support any candidate and refused to allow the contenders to adopt Gangnam Style as their campaign anthem. But that didn't stop Park from galloping along to the hit song. As the Hollywood Reporter noted at the time of her election, the South Korean leader had "been spotted more than once doing the famous 'horse dance.'"

By all accounts, the inauguration of South Korean President Park Geun-hye on Monday was a stately affair — that is, until the rapper Psy took the stage. "I know this is a very formal event, but if you could please stand up and join me for the horse dance, it would be great," the South Korean artist told the crowd (and all we got was a lip-sync controversy?). The Guardian is characterizing the performance as a "family-friendly version" of Gangnam Style. Here’s the video:

During the South Korean presidential election, Psy didn’t publicly support any candidate and refused to allow the contenders to adopt Gangnam Style as their campaign anthem. But that didn’t stop Park from galloping along to the hit song. As the Hollywood Reporter noted at the time of her election, the South Korean leader had "been spotted more than once doing the famous ‘horse dance.’"

Uri Friedman is deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. Before joining FP, he reported for the Christian Science Monitor, worked on corporate strategy for Atlantic Media, helped launch the Atlantic Wire, and covered international affairs for the site. A proud native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he studied European history at the University of Pennsylvania and has lived in Barcelona, Spain and Geneva, Switzerland. Twitter: @UriLF

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