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Jake Sullivan is Biden’s new national security advisor

Former Hillary Clinton aide Jake Sullivan will be the new national security advisor for Vice President Joe Biden, the White House announced today. Sullivan’s move over to the Office of the Vice President had been rumored for some time, but was not finalized until this week. Sullivan, who served as then Secretary of State Clinton’s ...

Former Hillary Clinton aide Jake Sullivan will be the new national security advisor for Vice President Joe Biden, the White House announced today.

Sullivan's move over to the Office of the Vice President had been rumored for some time, but was not finalized until this week. Sullivan, who served as then Secretary of State Clinton's deputy chief of staff and then also simultaneously as her director of policy planning, was also considering a return to his native Minnesota to begin a political career and potentially a run for Congress, multiple sources told The Cable.

In the end, Sullivan decided to take the job, offered by Biden, to replace Tony Blinken, who succeeded Denis McDonough as principal deputy national security advisor to President Barack Obama. McDonough succeeded Jack Lew, who is moving next door to head the Treasury Department, as White House chief of staff.

Former Hillary Clinton aide Jake Sullivan will be the new national security advisor for Vice President Joe Biden, the White House announced today.

Sullivan’s move over to the Office of the Vice President had been rumored for some time, but was not finalized until this week. Sullivan, who served as then Secretary of State Clinton’s deputy chief of staff and then also simultaneously as her director of policy planning, was also considering a return to his native Minnesota to begin a political career and potentially a run for Congress, multiple sources told The Cable.

In the end, Sullivan decided to take the job, offered by Biden, to replace Tony Blinken, who succeeded Denis McDonough as principal deputy national security advisor to President Barack Obama. McDonough succeeded Jack Lew, who is moving next door to head the Treasury Department, as White House chief of staff.

“Jake is the ideal person to serve as my National Security Advisor,” Biden said in statement. “He is respected across the Administration for his intellect, his dedication to our country, and the perspective he brings to even the most complex issues. He has been part of some of the biggest foreign policy challenges our nation has faced, and he’s always handled himself with incredible skill. I’m glad to welcome Jake to my team, and I look forward to working with him.”

Here’s Sullivan’s bio as released today by the White House:

Mr. Sullivan joined the State Department in January 2009 as Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy. He also served as Deputy Policy Director on then-Senator Clinton’s presidential campaign, and was previously Chief Counsel to Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, his home state. Trained as a lawyer, he worked as an associate at the Minneapolis law firm of Faegre & Benson and as an adjunct professor at the University of St. Thomas Law School. Mr. Sullivan served as a clerk for Judge Guido Calabresi of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and for Justice Stephen Breyer of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Mr. Sullivan graduated from Yale College with a degree in Political Science and International Studies. He earned an M.Phil. in International Relations from Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, where he served as managing editor of the Oxford International Review. He earned a J.D. from Yale Law School, where he was an Articles Editor of the Yale Law Journal.

Mr. Sullivan’s formal title will be Deputy Assistant to the President and National Security Advisor to the Vice President.

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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