Photographer Louie Palu wins White House awards

We’re excited to announce that Louie Palu’s powerful photography from the U.S.-Mexico border, which appeared in FP‘s January/February issue, has won multiple awards from the White House News Photographers Association (WHNPA). The image above, which shows a 20-year-old from Chiapas, Mexico in a migrant shelter the night after she was deported from the United States, ...

Louie Palu/Zuma Press for FP
Louie Palu/Zuma Press for FP
Louie Palu/Zuma Press for FP

We're excited to announce that Louie Palu's powerful photography from the U.S.-Mexico border, which appeared in FP's January/February issue, has won multiple awards from the White House News Photographers Association (WHNPA). The image above, which shows a 20-year-old from Chiapas, Mexico in a migrant shelter the night after she was deported from the United States, won first place in the WHNPA's Portrait category. The picture also finished in second place in the Pictures of the Year International's Portrait category. 

The photo below, of a man shot multiple times in drug-related violence in the Mexican city of Culiacán, won first place in the WHNPA's International News Picture category.

We’re excited to announce that Louie Palu’s powerful photography from the U.S.-Mexico border, which appeared in FP‘s January/February issue, has won multiple awards from the White House News Photographers Association (WHNPA). The image above, which shows a 20-year-old from Chiapas, Mexico in a migrant shelter the night after she was deported from the United States, won first place in the WHNPA’s Portrait category. The picture also finished in second place in the Pictures of the Year International‘s Portrait category. 

The photo below, of a man shot multiple times in drug-related violence in the Mexican city of Culiacán, won first place in the WHNPA’s International News Picture category.

You can see Palu’s full photo essay for Foreign Policy here. And check out this video of Palu discussing why he embarked on the ambitious project, which was funded by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. “I had been seeing a lot of news reports on the escalating violence, and I wanted to peel away the layers of what’s really happening on the border,” he explains.

Uri Friedman is deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. Before joining FP, he reported for the Christian Science Monitor, worked on corporate strategy for Atlantic Media, helped launch the Atlantic Wire, and covered international affairs for the site. A proud native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he studied European history at the University of Pennsylvania and has lived in Barcelona, Spain and Geneva, Switzerland. Twitter: @UriLF

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