Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel reports for duty

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has taken the oath of office.   Hagel was sworn in on Wednesday morning in his office at the Pentagon, becoming President Obama’s third defense secretary. Hagel immediately met with senior staff and is scheduled for a 10:30am speech in the Pentagon auditorium for his first public remarks as secretary.   ...

DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley/Released
DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley/Released
DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley/Released

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has taken the oath of office.
 
Hagel was sworn in on Wednesday morning in his office at the Pentagon, becoming President Obama’s third defense secretary. Hagel immediately met with senior staff and is scheduled for a 10:30am speech in the Pentagon auditorium for his first public remarks as secretary.
 
Hagel’s tenure follows a months-long battle with Republicans in Congress who opposed his nomination, filibustered the final vote on his confirmation, but ultimately were unable to prevent his installation.
 
He is expected to follow the tradition of his predecessors and visit U.S. troops deployed overseas soon.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has taken the oath of office.
 
Hagel was sworn in on Wednesday morning in his office at the Pentagon, becoming President Obama’s third defense secretary. Hagel immediately met with senior staff and is scheduled for a 10:30am speech in the Pentagon auditorium for his first public remarks as secretary.
 
Hagel’s tenure follows a months-long battle with Republicans in Congress who opposed his nomination, filibustered the final vote on his confirmation, but ultimately were unable to prevent his installation.
 
He is expected to follow the tradition of his predecessors and visit U.S. troops deployed overseas soon.

Kevin Baron is a national security reporter for Foreign Policy, covering defense and military issues in Washington. He is also vice president of the Pentagon Press Association. Baron previously was a national security staff writer for National Journal, covering the "business of war." Prior to that, Baron worked in the resident daily Pentagon press corps as a reporter/photographer for Stars and Stripes. For three years with Stripes, Baron covered the building and traveled overseas extensively with the secretary of defense and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, covering official visits to Afghanistan and Iraq, the Middle East and Europe, China, Japan and South Korea, in more than a dozen countries. From 2004 to 2009, Baron was the Boston Globe Washington bureau's investigative projects reporter, covering defense, international affairs, lobbying and other issues. Before that, he muckraked at the Center for Public Integrity. Baron has reported on assignment from Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, the Middle East and the South Pacific. He was won two Polk Awards, among other honors. He has a B.A. in international studies from the University of Richmond and M.A. in media and public affairs from George Washington University. Originally from Orlando, Fla., Baron has lived in the Washington area since 1998 and currently resides in Northern Virginia with his wife, three sons, and the family dog, The Edge. Twitter: @FPBaron

More from Foreign Policy

A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.
A Panzerhaubitze 2000 tank howitzer fires during a mission in Ukraine’s Donetsk region.

Lessons for the Next War

Twelve experts weigh in on how to prevent, deter, and—if necessary—fight the next conflict.

An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
An illustration showing a torn Russian flag and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

It’s High Time to Prepare for Russia’s Collapse

Not planning for the possibility of disintegration betrays a dangerous lack of imagination.

An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.
An unexploded tail section of a cluster bomb is seen in Ukraine.

Turkey Is Sending Cold War-Era Cluster Bombs to Ukraine

The artillery-fired cluster munitions could be lethal to Russian troops—and Ukrainian civilians.

A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol  January 8, 2009 in Washington.
A joint session of Congress meets to count the Electoral College vote from the 2008 presidential election the House Chamber in the U.S. Capitol January 8, 2009 in Washington.

Congrats, You’re a Member of Congress. Now Listen Up.

Some brief foreign-policy advice for the newest members of the U.S. legislature.