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GOP Senators call Karzai ‘nutty’ ‘bizarre’ ‘offensive’ and ‘disrespectful’

The Republican Senate caucus is fed up with Afghan President Hamid Karzai and openly looking forward to his departure, following Karzai’s recent accusation that the United States is colluding with the Taliban. Karzai marred Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel‘s first official visit to Afghanistan last weekend by publicly accusing the United States of conspiring with the ...

SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images
SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images
SHAH MARAI/AFP/Getty Images

The Republican Senate caucus is fed up with Afghan President Hamid Karzai and openly looking forward to his departure, following Karzai's recent accusation that the United States is colluding with the Taliban.

Karzai marred Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel's first official visit to Afghanistan last weekend by publicly accusing the United States of conspiring with the Taliban to destabilize his country in order to create conditions that would require the extended presence of U.S. troops. The joint press conference between Karzai and Hagel was cancelled after Karzai's outburst.

The incident was only the latest string of accusations Karzai has leveled against the United States, including the recent allegation that U.S. Special Forces were murdering innocent civilians in Wardak province.

The Republican Senate caucus is fed up with Afghan President Hamid Karzai and openly looking forward to his departure, following Karzai’s recent accusation that the United States is colluding with the Taliban.

Karzai marred Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel‘s first official visit to Afghanistan last weekend by publicly accusing the United States of conspiring with the Taliban to destabilize his country in order to create conditions that would require the extended presence of U.S. troops. The joint press conference between Karzai and Hagel was cancelled after Karzai’s outburst.

The incident was only the latest string of accusations Karzai has leveled against the United States, including the recent allegation that U.S. Special Forces were murdering innocent civilians in Wardak province.

On Capitol Hill Tuesday, several senior GOP senators told The Cable that they can’t wait to be finished with dealing with Karzai, who will step down after new presidential elections in 2014.

"That guy never ceases to amaze me. He’s bizarre. He continues to be someone who hurts rather than helps the relationship," said Senate Foreign Relations Committee ranking Republican Bob Corker (R-TN). "That’s why I’ve said the elections in 2014 are one of the most crucial factors in what our involvement there going forward will be. I have a very low regard for Karzai and it’s a shame that he’s been the way that he’s been."

Corker said the U.S. mission in Afghanistan is important regardless of the poor relationship with Karzai and that the United States has to make decisions based on American security and American interests.

"At the end of the day, in spite of the nutty things that [Karzai] says from time to time, in spite of the disrespect that he shows for the men and women who have lost their lives and kept him alive, we have to continue to look at what is in our nation’s best interest," he said.

Senate Armed Services Committee member Lindsey Graham (R-SC) told The Cable that he too wanted to continue to work with the Afghans, but that if Karzai and his government aren’t going to play a constructive role, he could advocate withdrawing American support for that government.

"I’m not going to invest in a country where I see no hope," said Graham. "They’ve got to want this more than we do. I am perfectly capable of pulling the plug on Afghanistan."

Graham said Karzai’s basic premise makes no sense because one would have to assume that the Taliban want the U.S. troops to stay in Afghanistan to believe Karzai’s theory. In fact, the Taliban want the U.S. troops out of Afghanistan.

"My initial reaction was one of disgust and resentment. At many levels this is bizarre," said Graham. "From the U.S. point of view it’s just offensive. It doesn’t do justice to the sacrifice of those who have been injured and died in Afghanistan. It was really unwelcomed by the American people… The good news is in 2014 there will be a new election."

Senate Armed Services Committee ranking Republican James Inhofe (R-OK) told The Cable that the incident shows that Karzai and Hagel are not going to be able to work together.

"I think [Karzai] was probably angry with his meeting with Hagel because they didn’t get along too well. I don’t get along too well with Karzai either, so I guess me and Hagel have that in common," Inhofe said. "That guy [Karzai] has always said crazy things."

Senate Foreign Relations Committee member John McCain (R-AZ) said that Karzai’s behavior shows the need for a permanent bilateral security agreement between the United States and Afghanistan that will govern the American military presence there so that Afghan politics do not play as big a role.

Hagel is not responsible for Karzai’s actions, McCain said. But at the same time, neither Hagel nor anyone else is likely to be able to repair the relationship with Karzai at this point.

"Our sights really should be set on April 2014 when they will elect a new president," he said.

Josh Rogin covers national security and foreign policy and writes the daily Web column The Cable. His column appears bi-weekly in the print edition of The Washington Post. He can be reached for comments or tips at josh.rogin@foreignpolicy.com.

Previously, Josh covered defense and foreign policy as a staff writer for Congressional Quarterly, writing extensively on Iraq, Afghanistan, Guantánamo Bay, U.S.-Asia relations, defense budgeting and appropriations, and the defense lobbying and contracting industries. Prior to that, he covered military modernization, cyber warfare, space, and missile defense for Federal Computer Week Magazine. He has also served as Pentagon Staff Reporter for the Asahi Shimbun, Japan's leading daily newspaper, in its Washington, D.C., bureau, where he reported on U.S.-Japan relations, Chinese military modernization, the North Korean nuclear crisis, and more.

A graduate of George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs, Josh lived in Yokohama, Japan, and studied at Tokyo's Sophia University. He speaks conversational Japanese and has reported from the region. He has also worked at the House International Relations Committee, the Embassy of Japan, and the Brookings Institution.

Josh's reporting has been featured on CNN, MSNBC, C-Span, CBS, ABC, NPR, WTOP, and several other outlets. He was a 2008-2009 National Press Foundation's Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow, 2009 military reporting fellow with the Knight Center for Specialized Journalism and the 2011 recipient of the InterAction Award for Excellence in International Reporting. He hails from Philadelphia and lives in Washington, D.C. Twitter: @joshrogin

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