Shadow Government

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My testimony on Syria’s humanitarian crisis

Yesterday, I testified on Syria at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s Subcommittee on the Near East and South and Central Asia. The topic of the hearing was Syria’s humanitarian crisis, but I made the case that we could not successfully address the humanitarian crisis without a successful policy to resolve the conflict which gives rise ...

By , a senior fellow and the managing director at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.
SFRC
SFRC
SFRC

Yesterday, I testified on Syria at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee's Subcommittee on the Near East and South and Central Asia. The topic of the hearing was Syria's humanitarian crisis, but I made the case that we could not successfully address the humanitarian crisis without a successful policy to resolve the conflict which gives rise to it. I proposed a strategy comprising three pillars -- people, funding, and military support -- each of which should have an element focused on the regime and one focused on the opposition. Among other things, I suggested that we channel more support through the opposition, that we provide arms to the opposition, make the case in NATO for strikes on regime military assets.

You can read the full text of my written testimony here. And you can hear my verbal summary and Q&A with the Senators here (my bit begins at 2:09:00).

Yesterday, I testified on Syria at the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s Subcommittee on the Near East and South and Central Asia. The topic of the hearing was Syria’s humanitarian crisis, but I made the case that we could not successfully address the humanitarian crisis without a successful policy to resolve the conflict which gives rise to it. I proposed a strategy comprising three pillars — people, funding, and military support — each of which should have an element focused on the regime and one focused on the opposition. Among other things, I suggested that we channel more support through the opposition, that we provide arms to the opposition, make the case in NATO for strikes on regime military assets.

You can read the full text of my written testimony here. And you can hear my verbal summary and Q&A with the Senators here (my bit begins at 2:09:00).

Michael Singh is a senior fellow and the managing director at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. He was a senior director for Middle East affairs at the U.S. National Security Council during the George W. Bush administration. Twitter: @MichaelSinghDC

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