Is this China’s first lady singing to troops after the Tiananmen Square crackdown?

China Digital Times posts the photo above, from Hong Kong’s Open Magazine, which purportedly shows a young Peng Liyuan — military pop star and wife of current President Xi Jinping —  entertaining the troops in Tiananmen Square in June 1989. The photo was originally posted by Weibo user @HKfighter, whose account has since been deleted, ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
611735_tian2.jpg
611735_tian2.jpg

China Digital Times posts the photo above, from Hong Kong's Open Magazine, which purportedly shows a young Peng Liyuan -- military pop star and wife of current President Xi Jinping --  entertaining the troops in Tiananmen Square in June 1989. The photo was originally posted by Weibo user @HKfighter, whose account has since been deleted, who wrote:

@HKfighter: After the Tiananmen Massacre, Peng Liyuan sang to comfort the soldiers. Open Magazine published this photo. [Then] for the 82nd anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party [in 2003], she sang the theme song for a commemorative film, declaring “fight for power, rule the country,” the heartfelt thoughts of the Party elders.

Paul French profiles Peng today on Foreign Policy.

China Digital Times posts the photo above, from Hong Kong’s Open Magazine, which purportedly shows a young Peng Liyuan — military pop star and wife of current President Xi Jinping —  entertaining the troops in Tiananmen Square in June 1989. The photo was originally posted by Weibo user @HKfighter, whose account has since been deleted, who wrote:

@HKfighter: After the Tiananmen Massacre, Peng Liyuan sang to comfort the soldiers. Open Magazine published this photo. [Then] for the 82nd anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party [in 2003], she sang the theme song for a commemorative film, declaring “fight for power, rule the country,” the heartfelt thoughts of the Party elders.

Paul French profiles Peng today on Foreign Policy.

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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