The next big thing in Japanese technology: coat-girlfriends

From the country that brought you the virtual-girlfriend game Love Plus comes the latest breakthrough in dating simulation: Japanese students at the University of Tsukuba have apparently invented the Riajyuu Coat, a jacket that hugs you and comes with a pair of headphones that whisper sweet nothings in your ears. According to the gaming blog ...

Sciencespacerobots.com
Sciencespacerobots.com
Sciencespacerobots.com

From the country that brought you the virtual-girlfriend game Love Plus comes the latest breakthrough in dating simulation: Japanese students at the University of Tsukuba have apparently invented the Riajyuu Coat, a jacket that hugs you and comes with a pair of headphones that whisper sweet nothings in your ears. According to the gaming blog Kotaku, riajyuu is slang for "someone who is pleased with their life outside the Internet," which may be wishful thinking for anyone who finds themselves in need of such a coat.

From the country that brought you the virtual-girlfriend game Love Plus comes the latest breakthrough in dating simulation: Japanese students at the University of Tsukuba have apparently invented the Riajyuu Coat, a jacket that hugs you and comes with a pair of headphones that whisper sweet nothings in your ears. According to the gaming blog Kotaku, riajyuu is slang for "someone who is pleased with their life outside the Internet," which may be wishful thinking for anyone who finds themselves in need of such a coat.

The jacket looks fairly normal but comes with a belt that tightens around the waist, as though your girlfriend were hugging you from behind. When you feel the squeeze, you’ll hear a sweet voice in your ears that says things like, "I’m sorry I’m late!" (even coat-girlfriends can’t show up on time?!). Here’s the promotional video:

The researchers don’t seem to be interested in selling the coat so much as just having fun with the idea. But the concept does suggest that Japan’s traditionally quirky innovation isn’t limited to robots anymore.

<p> Colin Daileda is a researcher at Foreign Policy. </p>

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