Watch Margaret Thatcher arrive at 10 Downing Street for the first time

We’ll have more soon on former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s death Monday from a stroke. But for now it’s worth highlighting one indelible moment from the Iron Lady’s momentous and controversial political career — her arrival at the prime minister’s residence and office for the first time in 1979. Quoting St. Francis of Assisi, ...

AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images
AFP/Getty Images

We'll have more soon on former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's death Monday from a stroke. But for now it's worth highlighting one indelible moment from the Iron Lady's momentous and controversial political career -- her arrival at the prime minister's residence and office for the first time in 1979. Quoting St. Francis of Assisi, Britain's first female prime minister declared, "Where there is discord, may we bring harmony. Where there is error, may we bring truth. Where there is doubt, may we bring faith. And where there is despair, may we bring hope." Thatcher would call the place home for more than a decade. 

Thatcher, who died at age 87, later returned to Number 10 during David Cameron's premiership:

We’ll have more soon on former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s death Monday from a stroke. But for now it’s worth highlighting one indelible moment from the Iron Lady’s momentous and controversial political career — her arrival at the prime minister’s residence and office for the first time in 1979. Quoting St. Francis of Assisi, Britain’s first female prime minister declared, "Where there is discord, may we bring harmony. Where there is error, may we bring truth. Where there is doubt, may we bring faith. And where there is despair, may we bring hope." Thatcher would call the place home for more than a decade. 

Thatcher, who died at age 87, later returned to Number 10 during David Cameron’s premiership:

Uri Friedman is deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. Before joining FP, he reported for the Christian Science Monitor, worked on corporate strategy for Atlantic Media, helped launch the Atlantic Wire, and covered international affairs for the site. A proud native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he studied European history at the University of Pennsylvania and has lived in Barcelona, Spain and Geneva, Switzerland. Twitter: @UriLF

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