The epic Bahrain protest videos emerging ahead of the Grand Prix

The Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix is scheduled for this Sunday, April 21. But if the country’s protest movement has its way, the race won’t take place at all. For months, opponents of Bahrain’s monarchy have pressed for the race to be canceled or moved elsewhere to prevent the government from profiting off the event. ...

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The Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix is scheduled for this Sunday, April 21. But if the country's protest movement has its way, the race won't take place at all. For months, opponents of Bahrain's monarchy have pressed for the race to be canceled or moved elsewhere to prevent the government from profiting off the event. And in recent weeks, they've stepped up their activity. While for some groups that has meant writing letters to F1 participants and promoters, others have taken a decidedly more aggressive approach.

The February 14 Youth Movement, for instance, has posted YouTube videos threatening to inflict "remorse and heartbreak" if the event proceeds. In this video, posted March 30, activists block traffic lanes with a car, douse it with gasoline, and light it on fire:

The Bahrain Formula One Grand Prix is scheduled for this Sunday, April 21. But if the country’s protest movement has its way, the race won’t take place at all. For months, opponents of Bahrain’s monarchy have pressed for the race to be canceled or moved elsewhere to prevent the government from profiting off the event. And in recent weeks, they’ve stepped up their activity. While for some groups that has meant writing letters to F1 participants and promoters, others have taken a decidedly more aggressive approach.

The February 14 Youth Movement, for instance, has posted YouTube videos threatening to inflict "remorse and heartbreak" if the event proceeds. In this video, posted March 30, activists block traffic lanes with a car, douse it with gasoline, and light it on fire:

The BBC reports that February 14 may have detonated a car bomb in Manama’s Financial Harbor district last Sunday. And another recently posted video shows several dozen activists armed with tires and at least 24 Molotov cocktails and several jugs of fuel shutting down a busy Bahraini intersection:

The February 14 movement is named after the date on which the uprising in Bahrain began, and its logo features the statue that used to stand in Manama’s Pearl Roundabout. From Feb. 14 to March 16, 2011, activists camped in Pearl Roundabout until Bahraini riot police and military troops, backed by tanks and Saudi soldiers, broke up the sit-in, killing eight protesters. In the ensuing crackdown, the authorities have arrested thousands of activists as well as others who did not participate in the protests, including doctors held on charges of treating wounded activists.

Bahrain hosts the Grand Prix annually, and the race returned in 2012 after being canceled in 2011 — an action that many diplomats and human rights groups have labeled insensitive at best and a boon to a repressive regime at worst. Bernie Ecclestone, president and CEO of Formula One, has been remarkably tone deaf in responding to critics. Earlier this month he told reporters, "Somebody who actually lives [in Bahrain] came to see me yesterday and said everything’s very normal." His succinct reply to a campaign by human rights groups was that "it is now too late to make any changes to the calendar." He claimed human rights concerns had not been brought to his attention when the schedule was finalized late last year, despite the uproar over the 2012 race. And he seemed only marginally better informed at the inaugural race of the 2013 season last weekend, telling reporters:

I don’t think the people who are arguing about their position are bad, and I don’t think they’re trying to hurt people to make their point. We have had all sorts of protesters — look at those complaining about Mrs. Thatcher. This happens all the time. People use these things when there is an opportunity.

As of today, the race is expected to go ahead as planned.

J. Dana Stuster is a policy analyst at the National Security Network. Twitter: @jdanastuster

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