Daniel W. Drezner

So you want to jump into social media….

With each passing day, senior scholars that I did not expect to bump into on Twitter… are now on Twitter. Christian Davenport joined recently, as did Jessica Stern. And there are others out there, lurking, trying to make sense of all the craziness.  For those academics who are Twitter-curious, Jay Ulfelder has written a very ...

With each passing day, senior scholars that I did not expect to bump into on Twitter… are now on Twitter. Christian Davenport joined recently, as did Jessica Stern. And there are others out there, lurking, trying to make sense of all the craziness. 

For those academics who are Twitter-curious, Jay Ulfelder has written a very useful primer on the do’s and don’ts of microblogging [NOTE: "microblogging" is a fancy generic word to describe Twitter or Weibo]. All of his points are spot-on, but these three are particularly trenchant for academics: 

Decide why you’re using Twitter. If your main goal is to use Twitter as a news feed or to follow other peoples’ work, then it’s a really easy tool to use. Just poke around until you find people and organizations that routinely cover the issues that interest you, and follow them. If, however, your goal is to develop a professional audience, then you need to put more thought into what you tweet and retweet, and the rest of my suggestions might be useful.

Pick your niche(s). There are a lot of social scientists on Twitter, and many of them are picky about whom they follow. To make it worth peoples’ while to add you to their feed, pick one or a few of your research interests and focus almost all of your tweets and retweets on them. For example, I’ve tried to limit my tweets to the topics I blog about: democratization, coups, state collapse,  forecasting, and a bit of international relations. When I was new to Twitter, I focused especially on democratization and forecasting because those weren’t topics other people were tweeting much about at the time. I think that differentiation made it easier for people to attach an identity to my avatar, and to understand what they would get by following me that they weren’t already getting from the 500 other accounts in their feeds.

Keep the tweet volume low, at least at the start. For a long time, I tried to limit myself to two or three tweets per Twitter session, usually once or twice per day. That made me think carefully about what I tweeted, (hopefully) keeping the quality higher and preventing me from swamping peoples’ feeds, a big turnoff for many.

Read the whole thing — and, while you’re at it, I’d reference this International Studies Perspectives essay that Charli Carpenter and I co-authored, which seems to be holding up pretty well. 

I’ll close with three other pieces of advice. First, think of these rules are more like training wheels during your introductory phase on Twitter. You don’t ever have to remove them, but over time, as you get used to the norms and folkways of the Twitterverse, you can indeed relax some of them. 

Second, that said, if you’re a senior scholar, keep those training wheels on for longer. If you have a "name" in the real world, there will be plenty of Twitter gnomes just dying to blog/tweet something to the effect of: "HA HA HA HA HA, look at the stupid old person trying to act all trendy. What a desperado." 

Third — to repeat a theme — don’t tweet at all if you don’t want to. Just join and treat Twitter as an RSS reader. Contra Chris Albon and Patrick Meier, I find the notion that Twitter is the new business card to be faintly absurd. There are, no doubt, a small cluster of individuals that can parlay success at social media into something more significant. For that to happen, however, there has to be some serious substance behind the tweets. Simply excelling at social media does little except to route you toward jobs with a heavy social media component. If you’re a budding policy wonk, think carefully about what you would like your career arc to look like before following Albon and Meier’s advice.

 Twitter: @dandrezner

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