Spare thoughts

1. Marc Sageman on the stagnation of terrorism research 2. Is there really a crisis in social psychology? 3. Rerouting bus routes with cell phone data 4. Francis Fukuyama responds to critics of his measuring governance idea 5. Mexican migration to the U.S. mapped by state  

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.

1. Marc Sageman on the stagnation of terrorism research

1. Marc Sageman on the stagnation of terrorism research

2. Is there really a crisis in social psychology?

3. Rerouting bus routes with cell phone data

4. Francis Fukuyama responds to critics of his measuring governance idea

5. Mexican migration to the U.S. mapped by state

 

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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