Daniel W. Drezner

The lost history of celebrity Twitter diplomacy

As Uri Friedman has chronicled elsewhere at FP, yesterday Dennis Rodman took to Twitter to engage in some outreach to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with respect to an American "tried" for espionage in the Hermit Kingdom:  I’m calling on the Supreme Leader of North Korea or as I call him "Kim", to do ...

As Uri Friedman has chronicled elsewhere at FP, yesterday Dennis Rodman took to Twitter to engage in some outreach to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with respect to an American "tried" for espionage in the Hermit Kingdom: 

Now I can only assume that "Kim," will react to such a moving plea by releasing Bae immediately. 

This got your humble blogger to thinking:  If only Twitter had been invented earlier, think of the humanitarian catastrophes that celebrities might have helped avert. Had Twitter arrived with, say, the end of the Cold War, this alternative history would likely have produced the following example of preventative celebrity tweets: 

1) "Yo yo yo Saddam, don’t bake in the Kuwaiti dessert when you could be chillin’ with me in Cabo!! Peace out!!" — Vanilla Ice (@VanillaIce), January 3, 1991

2) "The Big Aristotle knows that Hutus and Tutsis can get along. So I’m asking them to stop the madness. And go see Kazaam two years from now!!" — Shaquille Oneal (@SHAQ), April 23, 1994. 

3) "The Muscles from Brussels is asking my old drinking buddy "Slobo" to pay up on his bar bet and negotiate a peace deal for Bosnia." — Jean-Claude Van Damme (@JCVD), November 1, 1995.

4) "WHASSSSSSSSSSSUP???!!! Hopefully no more anthrax attacks.  Seriously, whoever’s doing that should stop, man." — Jonathan Taylor Thomas (@JTTtruth), September 30, 2001. 

5) "I’m really happy for you, imma let you finish, GWB, but Putin is one of the best strongmen of all time, and he should stop cracking down." — Kanye West (@kanyewest), May 3, 2005. 

Readers are welcome to suggest other lost tweets out there in the comments. 

 Twitter: @dandrezner

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