Transitions

Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, May 28, 2013

Democracy Lab Editor Christian Caryl writes about the Camp David peace accords — and why he decided to leave the story out of his new book on the fateful year of 1979. Jeff Gedmin interviews Tawakkol Karman, Yemen’s Nobel Peace Prize-winning activist, about the precarious situation in her homeland. Anna Nemtsova reports on the arrest ...

Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images
Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images

Democracy Lab Editor Christian Caryl writes about the Camp David peace accords -- and why he decided to leave the story out of his new book on the fateful year of 1979.

Jeff Gedmin interviews Tawakkol Karman, Yemen's Nobel Peace Prize-winning activist, about the precarious situation in her homeland.

Anna Nemtsova reports on the arrest of one of President Mikheil Saakashvili's most important political allies in Georgia.

Democracy Lab Editor Christian Caryl writes about the Camp David peace accords — and why he decided to leave the story out of his new book on the fateful year of 1979.

Jeff Gedmin interviews Tawakkol Karman, Yemen’s Nobel Peace Prize-winning activist, about the precarious situation in her homeland.

Anna Nemtsova reports on the arrest of one of President Mikheil Saakashvili’s most important political allies in Georgia.

Juan Nagel explains what a high-profile political scandal in Venezuela reveals about divides within the ruling elite.

Jackee Batanda reports on a media crackdown in Uganda triggered by a surprising leak from the senior levels of the country’s administration.

And Mohamed Eljarh writes about the Libyan government’s quixotic plan to thwart corruption by assigning ID numbers to the country’s citizens.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

The Washington Post’s Fred Hiatt offers a skeptical take on his meeting with Burmese President Thein Sein in Washington.

Democracy Digest analyzes the inability of Egypt’s secular democrats to capitalize on the current weakness of the ruling Muslim Brotherhood. Reuters’ Martin Dokoupil reports that the International Monetary Fund is growing increasingly worried about Egypt’s widening budget gap.

Columbia University professor Chris Blattman has a straightforward recipe for helping the poor: Give them cash.

Francis Ghilès of the Barcelona Center for International Affairs provides a concise summary of the state of the transition in Tunisia.

FP’s own Joe Sheffer offers a riveting dispatch from a local conflict in Yemen that could have global consequences.

Writing for the Atlantic Council, Rudolph Atallah assesses the threat of terrorism in Mali. The Council’s Karim Mezran predicts that Algeria may be moving toward the brink of revolution.

Sulome Anderson reports for The Atlantic on the predicament of Syrian refugees who are being forced into marriage to secure food security and escape sexual harassment.

And finally, former British diplomat Charles Crawford serves up a sardonic blog post on the right way to field a journalist’s question about elections in Iran.

 Twitter: @ccaryl
Neha Paliwal is the Editorial Assistant for Democracy Lab.

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