There is a movie where Israel and Hezbollah ally to fight zombies

  Dan Drezner, call your office. A new Israeli horror film, Cannon Fodder, depicts the tribulations of an IDF commando team that enters south Lebanon — only to discover their problem isn’t Hezbollah, but marauding zombie hordes. To make a not particularly long but certainly confusing story short, the Israeli commandos and the Lebanese paramilitary ...

 

Dan Drezner, call your office. A new Israeli horror film, Cannon Fodder, depicts the tribulations of an IDF commando team that enters south Lebanon -- only to discover their problem isn't Hezbollah, but marauding zombie hordes.

To make a not particularly long but certainly confusing story short, the Israeli commandos and the Lebanese paramilitary organization join forces in order to combat the zombie menace. Along the way, there are people beheading zombies with swords, a man on fire, and no shortage of puns about the real-life Mideast conflict. As the preview intones: "In a region infected by war ... where bad blood consumes all hopes for peace ... the fight for borders has lost its meaning."

 

Dan Drezner, call your office. A new Israeli horror film, Cannon Fodder, depicts the tribulations of an IDF commando team that enters south Lebanon — only to discover their problem isn’t Hezbollah, but marauding zombie hordes.

To make a not particularly long but certainly confusing story short, the Israeli commandos and the Lebanese paramilitary organization join forces in order to combat the zombie menace. Along the way, there are people beheading zombies with swords, a man on fire, and no shortage of puns about the real-life Mideast conflict. As the preview intones: "In a region infected by war … where bad blood consumes all hopes for peace … the fight for borders has lost its meaning."

There is a long history of Israeli filmmakers using Lebanon as a backdrop for self-criticism: Lebanon, Beaufort, and Waltz With Bashir all grappled with the moral and political consequences of Israel’s long occupation of the country. Cannon Fodder, it seems, uses Israel’s northern neighbor to ask a slightly less relevant question: Could a zombie invasion bring peace to the Middle East? Sure, why not.

(hat tip to Tablet Magazine for bringing Cannon Fodder to our attention) 

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