FP’s Susan Glasser moves to Politico

On Sunday, FP Editor in Chief Susan Glasser announced that she will be leaving Foreign Policy to launch and run a daily print and online magazine at Politico, where she will be "charged with creating and running new editorial divisions that produce deep, magazine-style journalism and in-the-moment opinion pieces," according to a memo from Politico‘s ...

609223_130602_susan_glasser_6052.jpg
609223_130602_susan_glasser_6052.jpg

On Sunday, FP Editor in Chief Susan Glasser announced that she will be leaving Foreign Policy to launch and run a daily print and online magazine at Politico, where she will be "charged with creating and running new editorial divisions that produce deep, magazine-style journalism and in-the-moment opinion pieces," according to a memo from Politico's John Harris and Jim VandeHei. Her full note to staff is below:

Nearly five years after we started building the new Foreign Policy together, I have decided to leave FP to pursue an unexpected and exciting new opportunity to start Politico magazine, which will appear daily on the web as well as in print. I do so filled with great admiration and pride for all that everyone here has accomplished in growing FP into the leading digital-era destination for international affairs.

This is an incredibly tough decision: I have been honored and humbled to have the chance to work with such an inspiring group of colleagues and contributors, and immensely proud of our incredibly hard-working, brilliant, and collegial team here that has managed this feat. From its guerrilla launch in January 2009 after just six weeks, the new FP.com last month reached its biggest audience ever, with 4.4 million unique monthly visitors and counting. Most importantly, we've worked together to grow the ambition, impact, and definition of Foreign Policy, to embrace original reporting, hard-hitting accountability journalism and just plain old-fashioned scoops about the making of foreign policy alongside world-class insight and analysis from the best collection of bloggers, columnists, and contributors around.

On Sunday, FP Editor in Chief Susan Glasser announced that she will be leaving Foreign Policy to launch and run a daily print and online magazine at Politico, where she will be "charged with creating and running new editorial divisions that produce deep, magazine-style journalism and in-the-moment opinion pieces," according to a memo from Politico‘s John Harris and Jim VandeHei. Her full note to staff is below:

Nearly five years after we started building the new Foreign Policy together, I have decided to leave FP to pursue an unexpected and exciting new opportunity to start Politico magazine, which will appear daily on the web as well as in print. I do so filled with great admiration and pride for all that everyone here has accomplished in growing FP into the leading digital-era destination for international affairs.

This is an incredibly tough decision: I have been honored and humbled to have the chance to work with such an inspiring group of colleagues and contributors, and immensely proud of our incredibly hard-working, brilliant, and collegial team here that has managed this feat. From its guerrilla launch in January 2009 after just six weeks, the new FP.com last month reached its biggest audience ever, with 4.4 million unique monthly visitors and counting. Most importantly, we’ve worked together to grow the ambition, impact, and definition of Foreign Policy, to embrace original reporting, hard-hitting accountability journalism and just plain old-fashioned scoops about the making of foreign policy alongside world-class insight and analysis from the best collection of bloggers, columnists, and contributors around.

Together, we’ve made FP into a unique home for those who care about the world, and those who shape it, publishing world leaders and Nobel Prize winners alongside powerful ground truth from the world’s kill zones and award-winning photography. When Hillary Clinton decided to pivot to Asia, she announced it in the pages of FP. Our annual Top 100 Global Thinkers year-end issue has become one of FP’s marquee features as well as a successful annual event drawing dozens of the thinkers to Washington. And of course, there are those war dogs and Vladimir Putin’s hairless cats…

It was hard to know what exactly would happen back in 2008, when Don Graham made the decision to have the Washington Post Company buy FP from its longtime excellent owner, the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. But Don’s vision and commitment to journalistic excellence led to the construction of a new Foreign Policy that grew to include not only its print magazine but a new website as vibrant, exciting, and interesting as the subjects it covered. And we’ve been so honored at the recognition this project has received, including the Overseas Press Club award for online general excellence as well as three National Magazine Awards for digital excellence and 10 overall nominations, including for Magazine of the Year, the industry’s highest honor.

When we started this project, we joked that "the world is not a boring place" and throughout this great team has proven that reading about it doesn’t need to be either. I am confident that under the leadership of FP CEO David Rothkopf and the wonderful team here, FP will continue to thrive, and look forward to doing anything I can to help in its success. I plan to remain at FP through June to help in the transition.

With great admiration and thanks to everyone, Susan

FP also issued a press release on the move:

Today the FP Group, a division of the Washington Post Company, announced that Foreign Policy editor-in-chief Susan Glasser will leave her position to pursue a new project.

"Susan has been instrumental over the years in helping to build Foreign Policy into the thriving, internationally-respected media organization it is today," said David Rothkopf, CEO and Editor-at-Large of the FP Group. "We’re grateful for her leadership and all of her tireless efforts to expand Foreign Policy’s multi-award-winning coverage in both print and online, and we wish her the best as she moves on to pursue new career challenges."

FP has enjoyed great success since becoming part of the Washington Post Company in 2008. The 44 year old publication has expanded dramatically its web and live offerings and just last month, announced that FP had broken readership records with 4.4 million unique visitors to foreignpolicy.com in April. Past editors of Foreign Policy have included Samuel Huntington, Richard Holbrooke, and more recently, Moisés Naím, who oversaw the transition of the publication from journal to glossy magazine form.

"Having the chance these last five years to imagine a new Foreign Policy for the digital era and actually start to build it has been the experience of a lifetime," said Glasser. "Don Graham’s decision to buy FP and his vision and commitment to journalistic excellence every day since then have been inspiring. So too has working with such an extraordinary group of colleagues and contributors. I’m immensely proud of our incredibly hard-working, brilliant, and collegial team and will miss them as I move on to a new venture."

Included among the new offerings launched by the FP Group in just the past year are:

  • FP National Security, a new channel launched last September to cover every aspect of the military industrial complex – from cyber security, to the Pentagon’s top brass, has now become one of Foreign Policy’s most popular features and a must-read for those in national security. 
  • FP Events taps the convening power of Foreign Policy to produce dynamic, solution-oriented events focused on the leading issues facing those making the world’s most important decisions. In the next 18 months, FP Events will present major programs on four continents and attract high-level audiences from the global government, military, financial and business communities.
  • Expanded delivery platforms via mobile and tablets, including FP’s dedicated iPad app in addition to a new, forthcoming version set to be released this year.

"There are many more exciting changes, expanding resources and new content initiatives coming to FP that we plan to announce in the weeks and months ahead," said Rothkopf. "We’re very much looking forward to the future and sharing what comes next
for Foreign Policy."

You can read more details about Susan’s new position here, and tributes by Dan Drezner and Marc Lynch to her truly transformative work at FP over the past five years here and here (for a visual of that incredible transformation, just compare FP‘s website now with how it looked in January 2009, before her ambitious relaunch of the site). We can’t wait to see what you create at Politico, Susan. We’re going to miss you.

Uri Friedman is deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. Before joining FP, he reported for the Christian Science Monitor, worked on corporate strategy for Atlantic Media, helped launch the Atlantic Wire, and covered international affairs for the site. A proud native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he studied European history at the University of Pennsylvania and has lived in Barcelona, Spain and Geneva, Switzerland. Twitter: @UriLF

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