Angela Merkel Discovers the Internet — and Inspires a Meme

Barack Obama’s visit to Berlin may have sparked a wave of commentary and analysis, but it was an offhand remark from German Chancellor Angela Merkel that gave birth to a meme. Responding to questions about the National Security Agency’s PRISM program during a joint press conference with the U.S. president, Merkel noted that the “Internet ...

TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images
TOBIAS SCHWARZ/AFP/Getty Images

Barack Obama's visit to Berlin may have sparked a wave of commentary and analysis, but it was an offhand remark from German Chancellor Angela Merkel that gave birth to a meme. Responding to questions about the National Security Agency's PRISM program during a joint press conference with the U.S. president, Merkel noted that the "Internet is new territory, uncharted territory to all of us."

"And it also enables our enemies," she continued. "It enables enemies of a free, liberal order, to use it, to abuse it, to bring a threat to all of us, to threaten our way of life.  And this is why we value cooperation with the United States on questions of security.

Sounds fairly innocuous, right? The web may not exactly be a new invention, but governments around the world are still assessing its impact and capabilities, especially after the recent revelations about American spying. Unfortunately for Merkel, German Internet users are not so forgiving. The German term Merkel used for "uncharted territory," neuland (literally "new land"), conjured up images of 15th-century explorers discovering previously unknown lands. For context, the closest analogy for Americans might be former Sen. Ted Stevens' infamous description of the Internet as a "series of tubes."

Barack Obama’s visit to Berlin may have sparked a wave of commentary and analysis, but it was an offhand remark from German Chancellor Angela Merkel that gave birth to a meme. Responding to questions about the National Security Agency’s PRISM program during a joint press conference with the U.S. president, Merkel noted that the “Internet is new territory, uncharted territory to all of us.”

“And it also enables our enemies,” she continued. “It enables enemies of a free, liberal order, to use it, to abuse it, to bring a threat to all of us, to threaten our way of life.  And this is why we value cooperation with the United States on questions of security.

Sounds fairly innocuous, right? The web may not exactly be a new invention, but governments around the world are still assessing its impact and capabilities, especially after the recent revelations about American spying. Unfortunately for Merkel, German Internet users are not so forgiving. The German term Merkel used for “uncharted territory,” neuland (literally “new land”), conjured up images of 15th-century explorers discovering previously unknown lands. For context, the closest analogy for Americans might be former Sen. Ted Stevens’ infamous description of the Internet as a “series of tubes.”

Germans are nothing if not avid web users (German Wikipedia is the third-largest edition of the online encyclopedia in the world, after English and Dutch, even though German is only the 12th-most spoken language on the globe), and Merkel’s comments quickly spawned a full-blown Internet meme — replete with a hashtag, #neuland.

Some expressed frustration about seemingly out-of-touch politicians legislating something they can’t understand:

 

Others responded with a little more humor. The caption reads, “June 19th, 2013 – Merkel discovers #neuland”

Some Photoshop efforts bordered on the disturbing, like this one:

And others, like this rent-a-car company, rushed to capitalize on the chancellor’s remarks. The caption reads, “For all those who want to discover Neuland”

Here, a flash video, entitled, “Merkel’s travels in Neuland,” depicts the chancellor dressed as a conquistador arriving on a tropical island:

 

And inevitably — per a kind of Godwin’s Law for Internet memes — someone finally brought up cats:

Park MacDougald is an assistant editor at Foreign Affairs.

More from Foreign Policy

U.S. President Joe Biden listens to remarks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on May 19.
U.S. President Joe Biden listens to remarks in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on May 19.

Russia’s Defeat Would Be America’s Problem

Victory in Ukraine could easily mean hubris in Washington.

Russian and Belarusian troops take part in joint military exercises.
Russian and Belarusian troops take part in joint military exercises.

Russia’s Stripped Its Western Borders to Feed the Fight in Ukraine

But Finland and the Baltic states are still leery of Moscow’s long-term designs.

Electricity pylons are shown under cloudy skies during rainfall near Romanel-sur-Lausanne, Switzerland, on Sept. 15.
Electricity pylons are shown under cloudy skies during rainfall near Romanel-sur-Lausanne, Switzerland, on Sept. 15.

Europe’s Energy Crisis Is Destroying the Multipolar World

The EU and Russia are losing their competitive edge. That leaves the United States and China to duke it out.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen announces new European Union energy policies at the bloc’s headquarters in Brussels, on Sept. 7.
European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen announces new European Union energy policies at the bloc’s headquarters in Brussels, on Sept. 7.

With Winter Coming, Europe Is Walking Off a Cliff

Europeans won’t escape their energy crisis as long as ideology trumps basic math.