Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, July 8, 2013

Mohamed El Dahshan argues that the military coup in Egypt is no cause for celebration. Juan Nagel wonders why Venezuelans aren’t protesting. Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez mourns the short and unhappy life of Egypt’s constitution. Christian Caryl muses on the limitations of the current wave of street protests around the world. Anna Nemtsova explains why Edward Snowden ...

STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images
STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images
STRDEL/AFP/Getty Images

Mohamed El Dahshan argues that the military coup in Egypt is no cause for celebration.

Juan Nagel wonders why Venezuelans aren't protesting.

Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez mourns the short and unhappy life of Egypt's constitution.

Mohamed El Dahshan argues that the military coup in Egypt is no cause for celebration.

Juan Nagel wonders why Venezuelans aren’t protesting.

Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez mourns the short and unhappy life of Egypt’s constitution.

Christian Caryl muses on the limitations of the current wave of street protests around the world.

Anna Nemtsova explains why Edward Snowden is a hero to Muscovites of all political persuasions.

Besar Likmeta reports on the surprising trend of good news flowing from the Balkans.

Sarah Kendzior looks on the bright side of Jennfer Lopez’s heavily criticized performance in Turkmenistan.

And now for this week’s recommended reads:

As Egypt once again moves to the center of the world’s attention, here’s a list of the articles that have helped us to understand the aftermath of last week’s ouster of President Mohamed Morsy:

  • Writing for Jadaliyya, Sarah Carr analyzes the vastly divergent perceptions of last week’s events among Egyptians.
  • Foreign Policy‘s Marc Lynch wonders whether Washington’s policies can have a positive influence on events in Egypt in the months to come.
  • In the Financial Times, David Gardner notes that "there is no such thing as a liberal coup d’état."
  • Mara Revkin, writing for the Atlantic Council, blames reckless Egyptian leadership for the violence.
  • Ahmed Awadalla directs attention to the fresh epidemic of sexual harassment in Egypt’s Tahrir Square.
  • On the London Review of Books blog, Hazem Kandil wonders whether the military’s move signals the end of Islamism.

And now for non-Egypt-related topics:

The Atlantic Council’s Duncan Pickard reports on the progress of Tunisia’s constitution.

Writing for The Atlantic, Sonni Efron tells the story of a Syrian "hacktivist" dedicated to warning Syrians of incoming missiles.

On the TED blog, Yasheng Huang explains why he doesn’t buy the argument that authoritarianism is a natural fit for China.

The Times of India reports that Buddhist monks, as shown in the photo above, are returning to temples that were closed in Bodh Gaya, India, following bomb blasts this past weekend.

Twitter: @ccaryl
Neha Paliwal is the Editorial Assistant for Democracy Lab.

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