Signing Off

In August, 2007, I moved from Brooklyn to Washington for what was supposed to be a four-month internship at Foreign Policy. When I wrote my first post on Passport, then the only blog on a website that looked like this, it would have been hard to imagine that I would finally be writing my last ...

By , a former associate editor at Foreign Policy.
585243_desk_02.jpg
585243_desk_02.jpg

In August, 2007, I moved from Brooklyn to Washington for what was supposed to be a four-month internship at Foreign Policy. When I wrote my first post on Passport, then the only blog on a website that looked like this, it would have been hard to imagine that I would finally be writing my last one after six years; more than 40 print issues; a redesign; a new blog; three offices; countless fact-checks, Morning Briefs, lists, Flashpoints updates, homepage meetings, Global Thinker bios, and slideshows; not to mention two presidential elections, the global financial crisis, the Arab Spring, Wikileaks, two Vladimir Putin presidencies, and innumerable Vladimir Putin slideshows. 

Today is my last day at FP. In a little over a week, I'll be heading across Dupont Circle to join Slate as a staff writer. I'll be writing more about my new project over there soon, but for now I just want to say how incredibly lucky I've felt to be a small part of the growth of this magazine for the last six years. 

New employees and visitors to our office often seem surprised at how small our staff is. Given the scale and quality of the product FP puts out every day, it is a small group, and the whole thing only works because of how insanely brilliant and dedidated the editors, bloggers, reporters, business staff, designers, tech wizards, and interns who work here are. I've been in awe of my friends here every day and I can't wait to see where they take FP next. 

In August, 2007, I moved from Brooklyn to Washington for what was supposed to be a four-month internship at Foreign Policy. When I wrote my first post on Passport, then the only blog on a website that looked like this, it would have been hard to imagine that I would finally be writing my last one after six years; more than 40 print issues; a redesign; a new blog; three offices; countless fact-checks, Morning Briefs, lists, Flashpoints updates, homepage meetings, Global Thinker bios, and slideshows; not to mention two presidential elections, the global financial crisis, the Arab Spring, Wikileaks, two Vladimir Putin presidencies, and innumerable Vladimir Putin slideshows. 

Today is my last day at FP. In a little over a week, I’ll be heading across Dupont Circle to join Slate as a staff writer. I’ll be writing more about my new project over there soon, but for now I just want to say how incredibly lucky I’ve felt to be a small part of the growth of this magazine for the last six years. 

New employees and visitors to our office often seem surprised at how small our staff is. Given the scale and quality of the product FP puts out every day, it is a small group, and the whole thing only works because of how insanely brilliant and dedidated the editors, bloggers, reporters, business staff, designers, tech wizards, and interns who work here are. I’ve been in awe of my friends here every day and I can’t wait to see where they take FP next. 

And thanks of course to all of you for reading. Keep on fighting the War of Ideas, comrades. I know that together, we will be victorious.  

Joshua Keating was an associate editor at Foreign Policy. Twitter: @joshuakeating

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