The Despair Over Mubarak’s Pending Release — in Twitter Memes

On Wednesday, an Egyptian court ordered Hosni Mubarak, the ousted Egyptian dictator, to be freed from prison, where he has been awaiting trial on a slew of charges related to abuses during his time in office. Mubarak’s release, which could occur as early as today or tomorrow, threatens to inflame the bloody week-long standoff between ...

KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images
KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images
KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images

On Wednesday, an Egyptian court ordered Hosni Mubarak, the ousted Egyptian dictator, to be freed from prison, where he has been awaiting trial on a slew of charges related to abuses during his time in office.

Mubarak's release, which could occur as early as today or tomorrow, threatens to inflame the bloody week-long standoff between the military-backed government and the Muslim Brotherhood. Serious analyses of the implications of Mubarak's release for Egypt's future and democratic aspirations are sure to come. But, for now, reaction to the news is piling up fast on Twitter, with users highlighting the absurdity of the situation. Two years after Mubarak's ouster, the military is back in control, and the country's democratically elected president is behind bars at an undisclosed location. That bleak reality is underscored by this depressing fact: a Facebook page created two days ago that promotes a potential Mubarak re-election campaign in 2014 has already racked up nearly 2,000 likes.

Here's a snapshot of the disillusionment dominating the Twittersphere in the post-post-Mubarak era.

On Wednesday, an Egyptian court ordered Hosni Mubarak, the ousted Egyptian dictator, to be freed from prison, where he has been awaiting trial on a slew of charges related to abuses during his time in office.

Mubarak’s release, which could occur as early as today or tomorrow, threatens to inflame the bloody week-long standoff between the military-backed government and the Muslim Brotherhood. Serious analyses of the implications of Mubarak’s release for Egypt’s future and democratic aspirations are sure to come. But, for now, reaction to the news is piling up fast on Twitter, with users highlighting the absurdity of the situation. Two years after Mubarak’s ouster, the military is back in control, and the country’s democratically elected president is behind bars at an undisclosed location. That bleak reality is underscored by this depressing fact: a Facebook page created two days ago that promotes a potential Mubarak re-election campaign in 2014 has already racked up nearly 2,000 likes.

Here’s a snapshot of the disillusionment dominating the Twittersphere in the post-post-Mubarak era.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what did we miss? Leave your favorites in the comments.

Twitter: @EliasGroll
Tag: Egypt

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