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Russian Press, Politicians Fume Over Putin Nobel Peace Prize Snub

Sure, some have spent the past few days lamenting that Pakistani girls’ education advocate Malala Yousafzai didn’t receive the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. But several Russian news outlets and politicians have been grousing about a separate slight: the Hague-based watchdog Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) wresting the prize from their own ...

BAYU ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images
BAYU ISMOYO/AFP/Getty Images

Sure, some have spent the past few days lamenting that Pakistani girls’ education advocate Malala Yousafzai didn’t receive the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday. But several Russian news outlets and politicians have been grousing about a separate slight: the Hague-based watchdog Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) wresting the prize from their own human rights crusader and international peacekeeper: Vladimir Putin.

"This is absolutely unfair that the OPCW was given this title," State Duma deputy Iosif Kobzon, a member of Putin’s United Russia party, told the state-owned news service Itar-Tass, according to Pravda.Ru. "Who forced Syria to destroy chemical weapons, if not Putin? Who made Assad sign all agreements of the UN Security Council for the destruction of chemical weapons? They should have given the prize to two nominees then. This is unfair, because Putin is making every effort."

The Russian federal news agency Regnum, meanwhile, reported on OPCW’s win briefly before reminding readers that it is "noteworthy" that the "process of destroying chemical weapons in war-torn Syria" was initiated by Russia and its president. Not noteworthy, apparently, are Putin’s aggression in Georgia and campaigns against homosexuals and immigrants in his own country — recent actions that might, one would speculate, undermine his shot at a Nobel Peace Price.

Technically speaking, Putin is not eligible to receive the prize until next year, as nominations for this year’s award had to be in by February 2013, and the Russian advovacy group that nominated him, the International Academy of Spiritual Unity and Cooperation of Peoples of the World, only submitted theirs in September. The group’s nomination cited Putin’s efforts to "maintain peace and tranquility" not only in Russia, but also in "all conflicts arising on the planet" — a sweeping appraisal encompassing Russia’s plan to put Syria’s chemical weapons under international control in an effort to avoid U.S. military strikes.

But that technicality hasn’t stopped Russian lawmakers from interpreting the Nobel Peace Prize committee’s choice as a snub. Alexey Pushkov, the head of the State Duma’s Foreign Affairs Committee, called it a "politically sophisticated choice" and a "cunning move" designed to withhold the prize from those who "truly prevented" the war in Syria.

Others have characterized the OPCW’s prize as, at its core, an award to Putin. An article in Russia’s English-language Moscow Times called the OPCW’s win a "nod to Putin" since the organization was granted such a crucial role in the conflict as a result of negotiations brokered by Moscow. Federation Council member Valery Ryazansky was especially optimistic, telling Russia’s state-owned news agency RIA-Novosti: "I believe that this is a recognition of the fact that the Russian government invited the international community to the decision on the Syrian issue, which was found to be most effective."

Another article at Russia’s Mail.ru site reported that Syrian opposition leaders were angry at the Nobel committee for, as they saw it, implicitly praising Putin and Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in giving the award to the OPCW, reminding readers that Russia was "the author of the idea of destroying chemical weapons stockpiles in the country."

Assad, it seems, wouldn’t mind the recognition. In an interview with the Lebanese newspaper al-Akhbar, the Syrian leader reportedly joked that the Nobel Peace Prize "should have been mine."

Maybe next year, guys.

 Twitter: @KatelynFossett

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