Stephen M. Walt

Travels and Travails

A heads-up for regular readers: I will be traveling for the next ten days and blogging will be sparse. I’m off to Cambridge University tomorrow, where I have the honor delivering the 2013 F.H. Hinsley Lecture. My topic will be "Follies and Fiascoes: Why U.S. Foreign Policy Keeps Failing," and the main challenge I face ...

Win McNamee/Getty Images
Win McNamee/Getty Images

A heads-up for regular readers: I will be traveling for the next ten days and blogging will be sparse. I’m off to Cambridge University tomorrow, where I have the honor delivering the 2013 F.H. Hinsley Lecture. My topic will be "Follies and Fiascoes: Why U.S. Foreign Policy Keeps Failing," and the main challenge I face will be sticking to the time limit! (Historical backround: Sir Harry Hinsley was a noted cryptographer in World War II, but also a prominent IR scholar, and you can read more about him here). I’ll also be visiting a seminar with IR grad students there, and looking forward to hearing what they have to say. Then into London for a talk at the European Council on Foreign Relations and another lecture at the London School of Economics on Friday. If you’re in any of those neighborhoods and have nothing better to do, c’mon by.

And then I fly to Abu Dhabi for a conference of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Councils. I’m on the council on "geopolitical risks," and we’ll be trying to figure out what the most prominent global dangers are this year. Suggestions welcome.

Our council will be shooting at a moving target given all the diplomatic balls that are currently up in the air. As you all know, the P5+1 didn’t reach an interim agreement with Iran after all, and the participants are now trying to kick up a bit of fairy dust, trying not to point fingers, and hoping that progress will resume in a week or so. It would be amusing to watch American neocons and hardliners suddenly discover an unfamiliar affection for the French–who played a major role in derailing the interim deal over the weekend — if the consequences of failure were not so worrisome. Let’s not forget that the main alternatives to a successful deal are either a nuclear-armed Iran, another Middle East war, and heightened tensions within the region. But we’ve got a great track record of reaching diplomatic agreements with Middle Eastern countries, right? Right?

So I’m crossing my fingers and hoping the negotiations succeed, even if an agreement would undercut the central thesis of my Hinsley lecture.

Stephen M. Walt is the Robert and Renée Belfer professor of international relations at Harvard University.

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